Fly Fishers Club celebrates new lodge

by Sarah Graham

The Fly Fishers Club of Tasmania celebrated the opening of its new lodge "Noonamena" at Little Pine Lagoon on Sunday 17th October 2010.

Members of the Fly Fishers Club of Tasmania celebrated the opening of the Club's new lodge "Noonamena" at Little Pine Lagoon on Sunday 17th October 2010.

Silver trevally on fly

Craig Rist
Whenever you set out to target a particular species you need to give yourself half a chance by fishing a place that has a healthy population. Georges Bay at St Helens has a good reputation for producing silvers on soft plastics and bait, so this was an obvious place to spend a couple of days chasing silvers on fly.

Fly Casting - Plane and Stance

by Peter Hayes

Casting Plane
Most beginner and intermediate casters do all of their casting with the rod tilted at an angle away from their body. I guess they're scared of being punctured by the fly and whipped by the line. They erroneously believe this angle will keep the fly and line away from them.
If you adopt this casting plane, and attitude, you will never cast with any consistent accuracy. You will often get wind knots. The fly and line will often collide into the rod. It will be nearly impossible to do any of the "tip over shoulder casts" and perform any of the aerial mends necessary for river and stream fishing. Of equal importance, you will be dangerous to have as a boat partner and your fishing mates will avoid you like the plague. Let me explain my ideas on this very important aspect of fly casting. Descriptions are all for right hand casters.

Squid on fly

Rob Paxevanos.
Bushy is still after that elusive wild ten-pound trout on fly. Harrison and Cooper have been in front of the pack catching makos on the long wand. The lads from A River Somewhere have been chasing bonefish in trendy places. Lefty Kreh and his mates have been fishing across the globe knocking up countless numbers of new species on fly. However, apart from the odd incidental catch, nobody, but nobody has had the courage (or the brains) to develop techniques for the ultimate fur and feather challenge squid on fly.

Mullet on Fly - It's a Start

The Derwent Estuary on Hobart's doorstep has many opportunities for the keen fly enthusiast.
To begin fly fishing, the Derwent is perfect and there always being a sheltered bay or corner that can potentially produce some top quality sport fish. Common catches are made up of small Australian salmon; barracouta; bream; flathead; cod and, of course, the humble mullet.
I found the Derwent to be a perfect playground with the calm, tranquil and most importantly close waters often being a better option than the lakes. The Derwent contains very large numbers of yellow eye mullet all year round with reliable catches.

Kids and fly-rods

Gavin Hicks
Let me start by saying that having kids is without a doubt the best thing that has happened in my life; apart from getting married (my wife will more than likely read this!). I will be totally honest and say I was somewhat nervous before the arrival of our first child, for a lot of reasons. There were all the usual worries and uncertanties that go hand in hand with parenthood, but I also had a few of my own to sort out. For the past eight or so years my life had pretty much evolved around my love of fly-fishing. My wife had milked cows seven days a week for that period of time which left me free to fish when and where I liked. Now I was faced with the prospect of losing my freedom, along with the constant stirring from my work mates that my fishing life would be over, and I was not sure of what was going to happen.

Bream on Fly

Craig Rist
I've been hooked on fly-fishing since I was a teenager. Pursuing trout and many salt-water species with the fly has been a big part of my fishing. Fly-fishing can take you on a life long lesson in casting, presentation, fish behaviour and the life cycles of the many different insects; crustations and baitfish, that make up the diet of the fish you want to catch. With each year your casting improves, as does your catch rate. The more you can learn about the fish species you want to catch, the better angler you become. This is probably the reason why I have never lost interest in fly-fishing. Sure, there are other forms of fishing that are far easier and more productive at times, but for me, fly fishing has been the most rewarding.

Fly Fishing April - May

Christopher Bassano

The end of April has traditionally brought about the conclusion of the trout fishing season for three months. More recently, things have changed and a few waters remain open year round. Amongst fly fishermen however, there is a perception that mid to late March coincides with the last of the "worth while" fishing. In reality, I believe the back end of any season can produce memorable fishing and after one as productive as this, those willing to brave the impending cold are likely to be well rewarded.

If I only had six flies

Can I please make it seven ed.?
Joe Riley
World Fly Fishing Championship angler Joe Riley takes a look at limiting his fly box to just six flies. Beginning and experienced anglers alike will find this a very useful study.

Mako shark on fly - are you crazy?

Craig Rist
Steve Hambleton and I have been fly-fishing mako and blue whaler sharks for the last eight years. In those early years we lost quite a few sharks while attempting to make an Australian salt-water fly-fishing record on 10 kg line class.

Increasing your success in mayfly hatches

Joe Riley
As you read this issue of Fishing and Boating News the mayflies of our Tasmanian waters are already listed in the specials on the menu board for our brown and rainbow trout. On clam afternoons the lowland rivers and lakes are already abuzz with red and black spinners, and the mayfly duns float adrift as the intermediate stage of this amazing insect makes its journey from nymph to spinner.

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