From the Archives ...

Tidal Talk August 2001

August is birthday month at my place. My wife Helen and two of our three children all raise the same question at the same time - what to get them as gifts.  A new fly rod for Helen? a nice reel for Sam? and a new fly line for Winston? Now that's got possibilities! Might also result in more time to go fishing - alone.
 Speaking of birthdays, the 17th of June marked the eighth year for the recreational fishing management section in the government's Fisheries unit.
That was when Greg Double and I started working together  to help manage and improve the recreational fishery.  So...in eight years, what have we achieved apart from the "odd grey hair" becoming the odd black one?
Read more ...

When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

Dry Flys With Attitude

If there has been one single revolution in Tasmanian fly fishing in the last three years, it would have to be the use of the English style reservoir dry flies. Popularly known as the pommy" dries, these bright little numbers have taken loch style fishing in the Tasmanian entral highlands by storm. There has been quite a bit written about them lately, and as he technique is developed even further, no doubt a few more thousand words will be pawned in fly fishing publications.

Ask The Guru

GURU
" An acknowledged expert, a teacher"
In this issue we begin a new column for readers to ask the questions they
were always too afraid to ask. Tasmanian Fishing and Boating News has
assembled the best fishing brains in the business to answer your questions.

To start off we have put together a few sample questions, to give readers an
idea of what is involved.

Jan's Flies

Posts
When learning to tie flies one of the methods that gave me great trouble was posts for dry flies. Most experienced tyers find the method quite easy, but if a learner tyer has not been shown how, like many other techniques, it can create big problems. I am often asked how to tie "posts" and what materials should be used.

Top 5 Anglers

One of the greatest searches that is conducted every fishing season is the quest for the best mayfly pattern. Any keen angler will tell you that. The difficulty with that is that there are so many excellent patterns, some of them shrouded in mystery, others blatantly simple and readily available. Some excellent patterns are to be found in all good tackle stores, or within the pages of any number of fly tying or fly fishing books.

Nymph Indicators

Poor results in fly fishing are one of those things that has always promoted lateral thinking. It has spurned better rods so longer casts can be made; a plethora of flies running to thousands of different patterns that will surely fool a trout, hundreds of different types of tippet material - including the supposedly invisible fluorocarbon. None of these are a panacea - and all fly fishers know the answer is not always available. Sometimes the fish just aren't eating. Many a lake fisher will tell of those dreaded days when stillness, sun and temperature combine to create horror conditions for fishing. As bad as a day as this might be for anglers - my wife would - for her pursuits as a sun worshipper call it perfect.

Tying an "Emu Squid"

by Richard Carter

The original Emu Squid fly was developed while I was working in Whyalla SA. Most of this work was with the millennium bug project for BHP's computer systems. The real reason was the great fishing in the area. Salmon, King George Whiting, Snapper, Yellowtail Kingfish and many other species - the only reason I took the job in the first place.

Mayflies - the fly and the fishing

by Daniel Hackett

There's something about mayflies, something significant. To the flyfisher they are the epitome of flyfishing - predictably unpredictable mesmerising creatures reeking of mother nature. I think it could be the mayflies ephemeral nature that is so mesmerising, fleeting slivers of beauty, existing above the water's surface for only a matter of hours. They are an order of animal that was given the title Ephemeroptera, derived from the Latin for short lived. Looking at a small dun one day I realised that I was staring at a small living glimpse of prehistoric artwork and furthermore that I was the only person in the world who would ever see it. Perhaps this why they're so special?

Mega Mullet on the fly

by Damon Sherriff

You might have read an article I wrote last year on monster sea mullet of the Tamar...well, this is the sequel to that story.This season, Steve Robinson and I put away the light spinning outfits and dusted the cobwebs off the fly-rods!  We had both caught some impressive mullet of up to 4.5 kg last season on conventional tackle but this season was a race to who could catch the first supercharged mullet on the fly, maybe in the State!

The Fun of Albacore on Fly

by John Orchard

When Ron Crowden from Georgetown rang to ask if I would like to have a trip out chasing tuna with Rocky Carosi I just couldn't resist the opportunity to test out the new entry level Driftwood salt water fly rod made by Blackridge. Rocky & his wife Angela run a charter operation out of St. Helens called Professional Charters and Rocky was confident that he could put us on to some Albacore without too much trouble, so the scene was set, weather permitting, to attempt my first ever tuna on fly.

Squid on fly

by Rob Paxevanos.

Bushy is still after that elusive wild ten-pound trout on fly. Harrison and Cooper have been in front of the pack catching makos on the long wand. The lads from A River Somewhere have been chasing bonefish in trendy places.

Fly Casting - Plane and Stance

by Peter Hayes

Casting Plane
Most beginner and intermediate casters do all of their casting with the rod tilted at an angle away from their body. I guess they're scared of being punctured by the fly and whipped by the line. They erroneously believe this angle will keep the fly and line away from them.

Secret fly fishing techniques of an English champion

John Horsey showed the "locals" some new techniques that will fool plenty of our trout. John was intrigued by the very slow way Tasmanians "strike" after the take and once he slowed himself down he was able to hook many more fish.

John explained that even although our fish descended from English stock only 145 years ago they often behave very differently, but in just a few days he adjusted his methods very successfully.

Fly leaders - the vital connection

Leaders are the vital link between the fly line and fly. Neil Grose looks at their development, plus their different applications and requirements.

Depth and retrieve

by David Higgins

Probably the most important tip I can give you when fly fishing with nymphs or wet flies is - which is pretty much all fly fishers can do this time of the year is: remember exactly how you were fishing at the moment a trout takes your fly and do it again!

Bead flies with a difference - Bead "bulging" nymphs

by David Higgins

One of the greatest innovations to fly fishing and fly tying, particularly in recent times, is the use of "Bead Heads" nymphs.There is no doubt that bead head flies in their many forms catch fish. Over the years, a huge number of fascinating fly patterns have been developed.

Trout and Fly in Tasmania

by R.H. Wigram

The original is a rare and collectable classic. Trout and Fly in Tasmania was published in 1938 during the war years and at this time quality paper was not available.

Corbie moths at dusk - testing time for fly fishing

by Tony Ritchie

Corbie moth time is at hand, and anglers on lowland rivers throughout much of Tasmania can expect to see some of the buzzing about over and on the water during the last light of late summer days suitably fine, calm and warm.

Fly fishing for Flathead with your trout gear

Solitude can be compete when wading a peaceful sand or mud flat, gently fishing through gutters, around weed beds and along coloured water lines. Doing it with fly tackle makes the outing all the more enjoyable, and just as productive!

Jan's Flies - Early Bird flies to try

by Jan Spencer

This time of the year is always an exciting time for me as it is for many anglers. There is great anticipation with the coming trout fishing season. Hopefully it will be one to look back on with great hatches and many fish landed.

Jan's Flies - Fly Tying

by Jan Spencer

Even though we are only into early Autumn the weather has been just lovely. At this settled time of the year the nights are cooler and the days are just beautiful. There is some superb fishing to be had both on the lakes and the lowland rivers.

Summer mayfly fishing in the Highlands

Jim Allen inspects one of his favourite Mayfly patterns - an emerging dun

Jim Allen, owner of the Compleat Angler chain of stories, is one of Australia's keenest anglers. Jim leaves Victoria every November and spends several months each year at his shack on Great Lake. Jim is a common sight all over the highlands in his little white Suzuki or fishing madly, either from the shore or his Savage Jabiru tinny. Fly fishing during the mayfly "˜Dun"hatches are one of his favourite times and in a recent interview with Mike Stevens he reveals some of his secrets.

A fly fishers guide to the trout fishing season

by Barry Hickman

"˜Knowledge is power"so the saying goes. In this article, Barry Hickman shares his knowledge of trout fishing season and what to expect, what flies are needed and when to use them.

Go to top
JSN Boot template designed by JoomlaShine.com