From the Archives ...

This fish and 6 more just
like it were caught on
Great Lake on a chilly
day in the middle of June

Presented from Issue 111, August 2014

There has sometimes been a view that trout fishing is reserved only for the experienced angler, stories of hours spent trying to unravel the mysteries of the cunning trout by elderly gentlemen dressed in tweed is what often comes to people’s minds when they think of trout fishing. Regarded by many to be the premium, freshwater sports fish of the world, it is not surprising that the many anglers put the humble trout in the too hard box. Truth is, trout can be as easily caught as any fish, perhaps not always as accessible and your bread and butter saltwater species, but none the less, with a bit of perseverance with the correct equipment and technique, results can come more quickly than you think! In recent years, more emphasis has been put on making Tasmania’s famous trout fishery more accessible to newcomers to the sport. This has been achieved by increased stocking regimes into waters with lower fish numbers, improving access to waters and more information resources available such as the Inland Fisheries Service (IFS) website and IFS Smartphone App. Angler surveys have also given the managers of our fishery a better understanding on how they can improve certain aspects of the fishery. This year is the 150 th anniversary of trout fishing in Tasmania, and with a Ford Ranger up for grabs for buying a licence, what better time to give trout fishing a go? Here are a few tips to help you get started.

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When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

108 kayak trollingPresented from Issue 108, February 2014
Kayak fishing is becoming even more popular and is a great way to fish. With our increasing awareness of the importance of physical exercise, houses getting bigger but yards getting smaller, and the ever increasing cost of fuel its understandable why. Kayaks open up many fishing opportunities denied to the land based angler, without the expense and logistics of owning a boat. Mic Rybka looked at some trolling techniques last issue.

Here are my experiences...

107 kayaksPresented from Issue 107, December 2013
For those that haven’t packed a kayak for a 3 or 4 day adventure this how I go about it. Firstly remembering your weight: I am about 100kg and I sit more toward the back of my yak – not in the middle as some are designed. Therefore I must think about how and where I am going to pack my gear.

107 kayakPresented from Issue 107, December 2013
A common question asked by new or potential kayakers is “what’s best – paddle or pedal?” The answer will vary depending on many factors. Intended use and budget are probably the main ones. This article will look at different propulsion systems commonly available and their pros and cons, hopefully making that decision a bit easier for newcomers to this kind of fishing.

107 tow theworm kayakPresented from Issue 107, December 2013
Michal Rybka reveals some deadly Great Lake, kayak based techniques using soft plastic worms. In fact this should not be kayak nor Great Lake limited. If you are a troller of any sort read on.
Worming from a Kayak – a different perspective

101 kayak troutPresented from Issue 101
Introduction

A kayak can be a very cost effective alternative to purchasing a boat. In terms of fish catching ability, a kayak can also be more effective than a boat. The ability of a kayak to be taken in very shallow water, combined with the kayak’s overall manoeuvrability, are the reasons for this. It is also no secret that often these shallow, hard to reach places also hold the best fish.

It is no wonder that, in recent years, the sport of kayak fishing has taken off all around the world. In the United States, this style of fishing has become somewhat of a craze, and many anglers are embracing the sport with a similar level of passion here in Australia. We now have kayak- fishing tournaments that are a national affair, with regular coverage in magazines and on television. Tournaments aside, many recreational anglers are choosing to fish this way simply because its a fun, cost effective and a productive way of fishing.

100 kayak troutPresented from Issue 100
Have you ever driven over the South Esk River bridge at Perth? I am sure that most of us have. On every trip to Hobart, the idea of fishing this section of river has been in the back of my mind. As a child, I often fished the adjoining ‘Charles Berryman Picnic Reserve’ with my father. It was close to Launceston and had very good access to a small side-water that branched off the main river. Being European, we targeted species that would normally be considered as pests, such as redfin perch and tench. Sounds crazy I know, but prepared the correct way, tench were actually pretty good eating.

Most of the time we fished the old fashioned way, using worms suspended under a float. I also used small redfin-patterned Celtas on the odd occasion. The traditional red-coloured ones seemed to give the best results, with many trout caught on these metal spinners in the picnic reserve side-water. However, access to good fishing spots in the river itself was difficult, as the banks were overgrown with willows.

Presented from Issue 95
Recent kayak popularity It was over 25 years, maybe 30 years ago, when I first saw someone fishing from water level in a boat. On a dark and windy night much to my amusement my mate John Rumph waddled into Lake Toolondo in the Grampians on a horrid night standing in what I think was the first ever float tube imported into Australia.

Presented from Issue 95
Huntsman Lake lies approximately 20 km south of Deloraine. It’s an easy, scenic drive via the small town of Meander. As most anglers know, the lake is only a few years old. It was formed in 2007 with the construction of the Meander Dam. The lake is fed by the Meander River and also by several small streams.

Presented from Issue 95
These days fishing techniques and fishing tackle just keep making more advances and becoming much more technical. I know I have fallen into that trap myself. I’ve just added a GPS to my arsenal, so that I can mark waypoints for hotspots. I also have a fish finder installed. Some kayakers even have high end fish finders with dual beam, side imaging, big colour screens and inbuilt GPS. The same kind of set up you’d see on a well laid out bream or trout boat.

Presented from Issue 94

Little Swanport is about one hour from Hobart and a little less than half way between Triabunna and Swansea. It is probably my number one saltwater kayak fishing spot. The reasons for that include:

Presented from Issue 94

The Great Lake is one of my favourite places to fish for trout in Tassie. It supports a large population of both rainbow and brown trout and the vast size of the lake means means that I can hunt for these trout with very few interruptions.

Winter fishing at the lake has been good to me this year; however, many of the fish that I have caught have been in poor or ‘slabby’ condition and have not put up much of a fight. Catching a brown trout that is half asleep and resembles an eel is not my idea of fun. No doubt the availability of food has a lot to do with this.

YakYak Catch

A beautiful morning on the Yak! This one came in at 6 1/2lb... He only just lipped it. Another kick of the tail and I'd be a shattered man right now.
Brendan Taylor

Click Read More for a full sized picture

Tassie Paddlers: YEP Tackle Fish-off - Johnsons Beach Penguin

We had a fantastic weekend with NO RAIN. I finally got it right. I would like to thank the members from www.Tassiepaddlers.net that entered this event. Also thanks to Dale and Yep tackle for sponsoring this event. Like Spork said a successful event. A great Friday evening with a catch up tea and a few bevies and once again we solved the world’s problems with our friendly possum wanting to taste Legs’ toe but with no luck, it was time for an early night around 11pm. Spork set the wake up alarm for 6:30 but I think members were up around 5:30- 6:00 We had a hearty breakfast then it was time to convoy to the fishing spot. What a remarkable great day on the water all catching something, squid being the flavour of the day.

Kayak Paddle Day

It's hard to make a decision on which boat to buy if you have never paddled a kayak before. Maybe your only experience in kayak is in one of those slippery white water boats that roll over if you look sideways. The large range of recreational and touring kayaks offered at Tassie Tackle and Outdoor cater to all skill levels from the rank amateur to the seasoned Sea Kayaker. Come along to the Trevallyn Dam Boat ramp.

For safe, relaxed paddling with experienced kayakers on hand to ensure your enjoyment and offer advice. Paddle a range of boats and enjoy BYO BBQ lunch to top the day off (BBQ Facilities on site). Kicking off at 11am on Sunday October 10th weather dependant, bookings are essential.
All safety equipment and kayaks provided, just bring yourself.

Test paddle day Saturday 9th October --- Turners Beach 1.00pm.
Test paddle day Sunday 10th October --- Trevallyn Dam 11.00am.
Bookings essential so we can make sure you get a paddle.
Phone Tassie Tackle and Outdoor on 6431 6500.

Tasmanian kayak fishing

by Nick Gust
Kayak-fishing is rapidly gaining popularity
around Australia. With appropriate equipment,
experience and favourable weather Tasmania holds
many diverse and exciting opportunities for kayak
fishing. Taswegians are getting in on the act with the
first kayak-fishing tournament held at Scamander
earlier this year. (see issue 85 for details).

Hobie Mirage Revolution Fish

Courtesy of IFS

Lately I have been thinking about the benefits of the Hobie MirageDrive and having your hands free for fishing. For those not in the know, the MirageDrive is a pedal driven method of propelling a kayak. Hobie calls it a "Revolutionary new propulsion system", and I must admit it certainly is an impressive system. The two blades look like the wings on a penguin. There is a good reason for this too.

Ocean Kayak Prowler 13

Craig Vertigan

I'm going to attempt to be as objective as possible when reviewing this kayak. I own one myself and love it to bits. But like all anglers I'm always on the lookout for the perfect bit of tackle, whether it be the perfect bream rod and spinning reel, the perfect five weight fly rod, the perfect fly reel to match, or as a kayak fisherman I am of course always looking for the perfect kayak for fishing from. I wouldn't say the Prowler is the perfect fishing kayak, but it is one that will perfectly fill the needs of many kayak anglers.

Yak Fishing Kit - What to stow when you go

John Pollard
In April-May (Issue 79) we covered what to wear on your body while on your Yak, this issue we will look at what else you may need or want out on the water with you. As previously mentioned we have very changeable and sometimes diabolical weather conditions, so what you take out with you on your yak takes some planning, consideration of your yak's storage capacity and good common sense.

Bream from a kayak

Craig Vertigan loves chasing all sorts from his "yak, but one of his favourites is Tassie's bream. Take some tips from him, get your "yak and go looking.

Yak Fishing Kit - How to keep safe and warm on a Tassie Yak

John Pollard
Kayaks have boomed in Tasmania-especially over the last year, but with our fickle weather we do need to keep comfortable in a variety of conditions. John Pollard looks at what you need.

Important kayak accessories

- Personal Floatation Device: A PFD is compulsory in Tasmania, although the definitions of a kayak are somewhat difficult to understand. Check out some of the stores that carry a range of kayaks to find a suitable kayak friendly PFD.

Installing a fish finder on a kayak

Craig Vertigan
If you want to take fishing from your kayak to a new level you should consider installing a fish finder. All those boat owners out there using them can attest to the benefits of a fish finder. They help you locate structure, discover what depth you are fishing, the nature of the bottom structure, the temperature of the water and if you're lucky a few fish may show up too, giving you an obvious indication that you are in the right spot.

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