From the Archives ...

Presented from Issue 109, April 2014
An excerpt from Origins of the Tasmanian Trout JEAN WALKER, Honorary Historian to the Southern Tasmanian Licensed Anglers’ Association produced an accurate and concise account of the fascinating story of the first introduction of trout to Tasmania in 1988.

Tasmania’s Inland Fisheries Service has just republished the booklet to celebrate the sesquicentenary (150 years) since the first tiny trout hatched in the Southern Hemisphere. Here are a few snippets from the booklet Origins of the Tasmanian Trout. Contact IFS on 6261 8050 to find a stockist.

TASMANIA’S early settlers were disappointed by the lack of freshwater angling. The only fish native to the inland waters were Australian grayling, small galaxias and in some rivers blackfish. None offered anglers a challenge in fighting qualities.

Bringing trout from England, 12,000 miles away, s seemed an impossible dream. That the dream, became a reality with perseverance, despite failures and setbacks, in 1864.

Read more ...

When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing -

Hello everyone, I thought it would be a good time to introduce myself.

My name is Stephen Smith and I have been managing the website since May 2009.

It has been an epic journey of learning and discovery and I am indebted to Mike Stevens for his help, support and patience.

I am developing a new venture Rubicon Web and Technology Training ( ). The focus is two part, to develop websites for individuals and small business and to train people to effectively use technology in their everyday lives.

Please contact me for further information.

Stephen Smith

111 jellybeansPresented from Issue 111, August 2014

By the end of the brown trout season I’m usually ready for a change, try to catch a tuna, stock up on some flathead or garfish. But by the first weekend in August I am refreshed and ready to go again. Early season is a great time of year in Tasmanian lakes, high water levels with cruising browns in shallow water, wet fly polaroiding, fishing with sinking lines to get to weed beds where the fish are holding and feeding, all great ways to catch an early season fish.

We all have our favourite flies and some great early season patterns. These are a few I like to fish early in the season.

Presented from Issue 111, August 2014
Anti-kinks are a unique piece of inexpensive tackle. They can be very useful used correctly. By definition they are design to stop your line twisting and developing ‘kinks’ which are the result of line twist.

As a rule I tend to go by the KISS principal. Keep It Simple Stupid. That is to have as little clutter as possible on my line at all times. Line tied directly to the lure or snap and that’s it. But there are times when it is necessary to use an anti-kink.

There are several different types, mostly plastic for want of a better word, although there are weighted lead, aluminium and brass version floating around but these tend to be older styles. All are designed to act as a keel and track straight through the water. All are shaped like a semi-circle or half-moon probably the best description.

111 6 lures rapalaPresented from Issue 111, August 2014
If you’re anything like me, your tackle box is overflowing with various trout lures that you have hardly used. I insist on keeping them however, just in case ‘the right time’ happens. However, realistically it is pretty much the same six lures that get tied on every trout season, simply because I have the most confidence in them. This confidence has come from years of these lures constantly producing good results; it is not easy for a lure to make the cut at being one of the six. There are so many good trout lures on the market today, lures that grab your eye as soon as you walk along the lure wall, however these six lures don’t just catch fisherman, they catch trout.

Monday 11 September the Australian Senate voted to approve the Product Emissions Standards Bill.
The Rules (Regulations) are being drafted and Industry has a further meeting with the Environment Department tomorrow.
The Rules are planned to commence next year, with the final imports of high emission outboards and mowers on 30 June 2018. Wholesalers and Dealers will then have a year to sell off old stock. All of this was announced in January – giving Industry 30 months clear notice – though regulations in general were in process since 2015.

106 epic rodPresented from Issue 106, October 2013
Epic rod build I had been tossing it up for a while; it is after all a big decision. Will I or will I not build my own fly rod? There are quite a lot of things to consider when you want to head down the path that is building your own rods of any type. The first thing that came to mind for me was, is it really worth doing. It is just so easy to walk into your local tackle store have a cast of the rod you are interested in, make the purchase and walk out the door again safe in the knowledge that you have an exceptionally well finished off rod with all the factory rod warranty trimmings to boot.

103 barbless Ian DonnachyPresented from Issue 103, April 2013

There’s lots of different anglers out there, lure bait and fly. There’s those who like to put a fish on the table, those who only catch and release. We all catch fish and we all need to be able to release a few or a lot of fish with as little harm as possible, so we can hopefully return and meet again one day.

As a group we are more aware of the need to conserve fish stocks and responsively harvest according to bag limits. Being a competition fly fishing angler, over the past decade I have seen catch rates amongst my peers soar, where once 3 fish would win a 3 hour session and a single fish in each of the 4 sessions would see you finish in the top 5. Now 6 fish a session is the norm and you need between 20 and 30 trout to win a competition.

Catching the bag limit is often reached and releasing fish is an every outing occurrence.

102 life learning giant trevallyPresented from Issue 102, February 2013
One of the most appealing things about fishing is the endless opportunity to lean or discover something new. This is what keeps me keen. Trying something new in fishing and have it pay off is like adding another tool to your fishing arsenal. It could be a new technique or type of lure, fly or bait that sparks an idea to try something new in your own backyard. Knowledge and ideas are gained through your own experiences on the water and through your interaction with other anglers. Some may have had 40 years of experience on the water while others could be just discovering the sport for the first time.

Either way, you can learn something from anyone, as long as you’re willing to listen and share your own humble thoughts and experiences.

102 big reels aPresented from Issue 102

Spinning reels are coming to market in a new range and size every other day. The Tasmanian Angler is spoilt for choice and it’s a great problem to have. Egg beaters are what we love to call these types of reels and for good reason. We are finding them used for a greater range of fishing styles than just spinning.

Presented from Issue 100

As the years progress and the fishing gods pull you further under their spell (and your partner allows you) somehow you seem to gather quite a collection of gear. Fly rods are no exception to this rule and I have even had to build an outside room so I am able to keep my collection away from certain eyes, if you know what I mean!. In recent years light line fishing has become more and more popular. With the number of people now going “Twigging” increasing, so to is the availability of the lighter line weight rods in varying lengths. Twigging is commonly referred to as fishing with 3 weight rods or lighter. You can now buy rods right down to a 000 line weight, and by the time you read this I will have one in the rod rack ( thanks Nick). Until that rod arrives at Essential Fly Fisher from the US the 3wt is as light as I own. Over the past few years I have become a lot more interested in the smaller stream fishing. There is just so many of these streams all around the state that are full of hungry fish it seems crazy not to fish them. As a result of this stream and river fishing I have built a small collection of 3wt rods.

$280.00 (Was $420.00) - 33% Off. Hurry, there are only 11 item(s) left!
This is outstanding value for money. It is a great outfit for lake fishing as a longer rod gives great control.
Perfect for lake fishing, using sinking, or sink tip lines from a boat. Casting floating, sinking or sink tip lines is a breeze. You also get and better lift and hang at the boat. This is a strong #6 that will cast a line into the next postcode and will cope with a #7 line easily.

Purchase it here at the Essential Fly Fisher

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