Hello everyone, I thought it would be a good time to introduce myself.

My name is Stephen Smith and I have been managing the website tasfish.com since May 2009.

It has been an epic journey of learning and discovery and I am indebted to Mike Stevens for his help, support and patience.

I am developing a new venture Rubicon Web and Technology Training ( www.rwtt.com.au ). The focus is two part, to develop websites for individuals and small business and to train people to effectively use technology in their everyday lives.

Please contact me for further information.

Stephen Smith


When I was a youngster I remember my grandfather, Mr Benjamin Sherriff, telling me a story of giant green-backed fish which he saw at a certain pylon in the Tamar River. Sadly, grandad passed away in 1985, when I was 11 years old.  However, I always wondered, in the years following, what these giant fish could be? I will never know for sure... but I have a reasonable idea they were yellowtail kingfish.

Fly Fishing in the Tamar Estuary

by Steve Suitor

Fly fishing in the Tamar Estuary presents a wide variety of species for the angler prepared to explore and experiment.

Each of these different species requires a different technique, a different location and, importantly, a different state of the tide for best results.

Tamar River turns it on

bey Michael Bok

The Tamar River has always been a bit of a bogey area for me whereas I generally get a feed I haven't had too many days that I would class as great. The last being several years ago when a mate and I caught five kingfish. All this changed recently when a non fishing friend, Ian Brickhill, and I decided that a days relaxation was in order.

Tamar River Snapper -The rewards of time and patience

by Steve Robinson

My first experience with a Tamar River snapper was some twenty years ago. My father and I were fishing for cod in Spring Bay when dad hooked a "very good fish'. After the battle that followed a beautiful 6 Ib snapper was landed. I had heard stories from old timers that snapper could be caught in the Tamar, but as they say "seeing is believing'.

The Bountiful Tamar - part two

by Steve Suitor

In this article I will discuss some of the seasonal species available in the Tamar River. These include ling, barracouta, whiting, squid, silver bream, yellowtail kingfish and snotty trevally.

The Bountiful Tamar River

by Steve Suitor

The Tamar Estuary is a rich and varied fishery with a wide array of species available to the recreational angler.

Where are those Tamar River snapper?

A family tradition of fishing on the Tamar River has given Steve Suitor an intimate knowledge of favourite haunts for many species. This article throws some light on the infamous Tamar River snapper.

Tamar River has much to offer at Beauty Point

Andrew Hart and Damon Sherriff discuss the fun that can be had from a wharf

Catch in the Kitchen - Whole fish in ginger and tamarind sauce

by Michael Bok

One fish that is often caught in some parts of Tasmania whilst fishing for trout is the humble redfin. Most people tend to think of this as a rubbish fish and don't do much with it. Personally, I would prefer to eat redfin to trout.

Winter fishing in the Tamar River

Steve Suitors home overlooks one of his favourite fisheries - the Tamar River. Steve points out that there is no need to pack the gear up just because it is cold. The Tamar River offers many opportunities for winter fishing.

The Lure of the Tamar

by Chris Beech

Situated about mid way along the North coast of Tasmania lies one of the north's largest water ways, the Tamar River. The Tamar begins its life at Launceston, being fed by the North and South Esk rivers and their tributaries, which drain much of the Northern Tasmania. Winding its way down the picturesque Tamar Valley with its multitude of cottage wineries, art and craft, and historic sites, the Tamar ends its journey to the sea, bordered by the coastal town ships at George Town and Kelso.

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