Presented from Issue 95
I think just about everyone has used, or have at least heard of the word ‘munter’ once or twice in recent times. So, what is a ‘munter’ you ask? I think everyone has their own little word for a trophy sized brown, brook or rainbow trout, I guess it all depends on where you’re from. For me, the word ‘munter’ applies for something big, something special, that fish you’ve been looking for a very long time. If anywhere in Tasmania, the Arthur River, or any west coast river or lake, is a likely place to find one of these large, much desired fish. On the 23rd of October, I was lucky enough to have finally caught one of these large fish, a true, wild ‘munter’.

Western Lakes

There’s a lot I could say about the attached photo! I could say it took us days of scrub bashing, boulder climbing, hard slog bushwalking to reach this remote shallow body of crystal clear water, located somewhere in Tasmania’s Western Lakes wilderness fishery. But really, it wasn’t too far to walk and the going wasn’t that tough. It was definitely worth the effort to get there and the rewards were so much sweeter.

Western Wilderness fishing

Shane Flude
I started bushwalking a few years before I started fishing in earnest so it is only natural that I later combined the two and began to explore Tasmania's Western Lakes. One of the first trips I did and one which I have done again recently was the Pine Valley and its associated lakes and tarns. Despite visiting this area several times, I still find it has everything to offer the bushwalking/fishing enthusiast and its somewhere I will probably visit until I'm too old to do so comfortably. It features a number of waters that mostly contain high numbers of moderate sized trout and several nearby trophy waters for the occasional monster. The area is easy to walk through, has tracks leading in from both ends to the valley and the headwaters rise in what would have to be one of Tasmania's most scenic areas, the Walls of Jerusalem National Park.

Tasmania's Western Lakes

Shane Flude
The Western Lakes is the term given to the huge area of lakes and tarns in the Central Highlands of Tasmania. The area is roughly bordered by Great Lake in the east, Lake Rowallan in the West and Lake Mackenzie to the north. The lakes are typically very shallow and clear on the upper plateau from the Pine Valley north. Further south and west the waters are relatively deep with well defined rocky shorelines. The western lakes are truly a world class fishery unique to Tasmania.

West of the Western Lakes

The Oxford dictionary defines the word "sublime"  as "so impressive as to inspire awe or wonder" . And if there ever was one perfect setting that fits this definition it was Lake Meston in late October.  Situated south of Lake Rowallan weather in this region can be iffy but we managed to plan our three day trip perfectly. Whilst there was substantial snow cover on the Overland Track and Walls of Jerusalem peaks, Lake Meston, nestled in-between was almost tropical! Well that might be taking things too far but it was mild, calm conditions and I reckon if there really is a Garden of Eden then this was pretty close to it!

Walking the Western Lakes

by Jan Spencer

Often I am asked where my favourite spot is. Really, it's where I happen to be on the day.

Having fished a number of places in the world I know we are so lucky in Tasmania to have fishing that is so diverse. From small mountain streams to lowland rivers, and thousands of highland lakes. The remote lakes in Tasmania, commonly known as the Western Lakes, certainly hold a place in my heart. I am not sure why, as there are certainly places more civilised and a darned sight easier to get to.

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