From the Archives ...

Presented from Issue 102, February 2013

I began spinning for trout in 1965 in the Finnis River, Yundi, South. Australia, at the age of 19. Now at the age of 67 I am still loving it just as much, if not more than the first time. I now live at Sheffield, Tasmania and spin the rivers in the north, and in my opinion they are some of the best rivers in the State to fish. The Meander, Mersey, Leven, Iris, Vale, Emu and Flowerdale rivers are just a few of the many across the NorthWest to try.

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When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

gawesworthSimon Gawesworth

The Australian Fly Fishing Museum is presenting International casting champion Simon Gawesworth to Tasmania.
Details and a flyer are here.
If you can't come, but have an item you would like to donate to the auction that would be great. All profits help run the Australian Fly Fishing Museum.
P.S. FREE Entry to Museum on Saturday.
World leading fly caster and fly line guru, Simon Gawesworth, is coming to Tasmania.
Simon is one of the world’s leading experts on fly lines and casting. As the leader of RIO’s line development team and chief marketer there are few people in the worlds with Simon knowledge of fly lines.

Australian Fly Fishing Team Fundraiser

Fun and Fund Raising Evening for the Tasmanian members of the 2011 Australian Fly Fishing Team
You are invited to an evening of fun and fund raising to support the Tasmanian Members of the Australian Fly Fishing Team who are competing in the 2011 World Fly Fishing Championships in Italy.

Fly Cards

Daniel Hackett

Reviewed by Greg French

For many years I have been quite content to use traditional Tasmanian fly patterns — the Red Tag, Mrs Simpson, Green Nymph, that sort of thing —after all, the choice of destination, the ability to see fish, and the ability to cast reasonably accurately are far more important than the choice of fly. In the last few seasons my attitude to flies has changed, however, quite dramatically so.

Fly Cards by Daniel Hackett

Reviewed by Greg French

For many years I have been quite content to use traditional Tasmanian fly patterns — the Red Tag, Mrs Simpson, Green Nymph, that sort of thing —after all, the choice of destination, the ability to see fish, and the ability to cast reasonably accurately are far more important than the choice of fly. In the last few seasons my attitude to flies has changed, however, quite dramatically so.
I am still no match-the-hatch man, but I have come to appreciate more than ever that there is something intangible in a good fly, something Rob Sloane in the Truth About Trout called ‘function’, that has recently increased my catch-rate by at least 20%. Just putting on a nondescript #12 something is no longer good enough for me, and it shouldn’t be good enough for you either.

Click here to read the whole article

Fly Fishers Club celebrates new lodge

by Sarah Graham

The Fly Fishers Club of Tasmania celebrated the opening of its new lodge "Noonamena" at Little Pine Lagoon on Sunday 17th October 2010.

Members of the Fly Fishers Club of Tasmania celebrated the opening of the Club's new lodge "Noonamena" at Little Pine Lagoon on Sunday 17th October 2010.

Silver trevally on fly

Craig Rist
Whenever you set out to target a particular species you need to give yourself half a chance by fishing a place that has a healthy population. Georges Bay at St Helens has a good reputation for producing silvers on soft plastics and bait, so this was an obvious place to spend a couple of days chasing silvers on fly.

Fly Casting - Plane and Stance

by Peter Hayes

Casting Plane
Most beginner and intermediate casters do all of their casting with the rod tilted at an angle away from their body. I guess they're scared of being punctured by the fly and whipped by the line. They erroneously believe this angle will keep the fly and line away from them.
If you adopt this casting plane, and attitude, you will never cast with any consistent accuracy. You will often get wind knots. The fly and line will often collide into the rod. It will be nearly impossible to do any of the "tip over shoulder casts" and perform any of the aerial mends necessary for river and stream fishing. Of equal importance, you will be dangerous to have as a boat partner and your fishing mates will avoid you like the plague. Let me explain my ideas on this very important aspect of fly casting. Descriptions are all for right hand casters.

Squid on fly

Rob Paxevanos.
Bushy is still after that elusive wild ten-pound trout on fly. Harrison and Cooper have been in front of the pack catching makos on the long wand. The lads from A River Somewhere have been chasing bonefish in trendy places. Lefty Kreh and his mates have been fishing across the globe knocking up countless numbers of new species on fly. However, apart from the odd incidental catch, nobody, but nobody has had the courage (or the brains) to develop techniques for the ultimate fur and feather challenge squid on fly.

Mullet on Fly - It's a Start

The Derwent Estuary on Hobart's doorstep has many opportunities for the keen fly enthusiast.
To begin fly fishing, the Derwent is perfect and there always being a sheltered bay or corner that can potentially produce some top quality sport fish. Common catches are made up of small Australian salmon; barracouta; bream; flathead; cod and, of course, the humble mullet.
I found the Derwent to be a perfect playground with the calm, tranquil and most importantly close waters often being a better option than the lakes. The Derwent contains very large numbers of yellow eye mullet all year round with reliable catches.

Kids and fly-rods

Gavin Hicks
Let me start by saying that having kids is without a doubt the best thing that has happened in my life; apart from getting married (my wife will more than likely read this!). I will be totally honest and say I was somewhat nervous before the arrival of our first child, for a lot of reasons. There were all the usual worries and uncertanties that go hand in hand with parenthood, but I also had a few of my own to sort out. For the past eight or so years my life had pretty much evolved around my love of fly-fishing. My wife had milked cows seven days a week for that period of time which left me free to fish when and where I liked. Now I was faced with the prospect of losing my freedom, along with the constant stirring from my work mates that my fishing life would be over, and I was not sure of what was going to happen.

Bream on Fly

Craig Rist
I've been hooked on fly-fishing since I was a teenager. Pursuing trout and many salt-water species with the fly has been a big part of my fishing. Fly-fishing can take you on a life long lesson in casting, presentation, fish behaviour and the life cycles of the many different insects; crustations and baitfish, that make up the diet of the fish you want to catch. With each year your casting improves, as does your catch rate. The more you can learn about the fish species you want to catch, the better angler you become. This is probably the reason why I have never lost interest in fly-fishing. Sure, there are other forms of fishing that are far easier and more productive at times, but for me, fly fishing has been the most rewarding.

Fly Fishing April - May

Christopher Bassano

The end of April has traditionally brought about the conclusion of the trout fishing season for three months. More recently, things have changed and a few waters remain open year round. Amongst fly fishermen however, there is a perception that mid to late March coincides with the last of the "worth while" fishing. In reality, I believe the back end of any season can produce memorable fishing and after one as productive as this, those willing to brave the impending cold are likely to be well rewarded.

If I only had six flies

Can I please make it seven ed.?
Joe Riley
World Fly Fishing Championship angler Joe Riley takes a look at limiting his fly box to just six flies. Beginning and experienced anglers alike will find this a very useful study.

Mako shark on fly - are you crazy?

Craig Rist
Steve Hambleton and I have been fly-fishing mako and blue whaler sharks for the last eight years. In those early years we lost quite a few sharks while attempting to make an Australian salt-water fly-fishing record on 10 kg line class.

Increasing your success in mayfly hatches

Joe Riley
As you read this issue of Fishing and Boating News the mayflies of our Tasmanian waters are already listed in the specials on the menu board for our brown and rainbow trout. On clam afternoons the lowland rivers and lakes are already abuzz with red and black spinners, and the mayfly duns float adrift as the intermediate stage of this amazing insect makes its journey from nymph to spinner.

Five minutes with Muz Wilson - the River Gnome

Peter Hayes
Muz Wilson is perhaps Australia's best know fly tier and more importantly he is one of the most innovative fly designers on the planet.
Recently while Muz was visiting Tasmania and participating at a fly fishing workshop at our Cressy facility Mike Stevens was able to identify the importance of this man and his contribution to fly fishing. Mike has asked me to pen a few words about this remarkable individual.

Dry fly close to home

Joe Riley
It's amazing how close to home good dry fly fishing can be found. As summer comes along the lowland rivers start to offer some exhilarating, and often challenging dry fly fishing. From trout cruising the slow moving glides or pools sipping minuscule offerings out of the surface film, to excited  brown trout freely leaping from the water to catch mayfly and damselfly on the wing. These fish are catchable. With a little patience, intelligent fly choice, a good  leader setup and accurate casting they can be brought undone, and once two or three of these fish come to the net you can really feel a sense of satisfaction about achieving a challenging task.

Fly lines explained

Peter Hayes
I am in the middle of my flycasting course season, and as I sit here making up the 120th practice line on to the reel I got to thinking. fly lines really are much more than "coloured string" as I often call them.

Sinking fly lines for early season success

Joe Riley
Joe Riley is as keen an angler as they come. With the opening season approaching he can barely sleep. Joe has fished in many competitions and in this article he reveals a few of his tips on how to maximise your results during the early part of the season with sinking fly lines.

Fly fishing during autumn in northern Tasmania.

Nick Voce.
The autumn season brings with it a certain kind of sadness. For me, the changing colours of the autumn leaves are a reminder that only a few weeks remain before the majority of Tasmania's trout-fishing waters will be closed for the spawning season.

Fly fishing in October/November - Tasmanian Northern Lowlands

Nick Voce
Some beautiful weather at this time of year has provided conditions that can only highlight the enjoyment of our favourite outdoor pursuits. Many of us will be encouraged to venture forth and pursue our fabulous trout.

The bizarre Booby - a great import

Joe Riley
Anyone who has picked up an English fly fishing magazine will have read about the virtues of the Booby. This bizarre looking fly has been around the lake fly fishing scene in England for close on twenty years. In this time it has become one of the "must have" patterns in fly boxes for everyone from rank beginners to the top competition anglers. The Booby is a fly that can be fished on every line from a super fast sinker to a floating line, it can be used for very specific purposes as a sacrificial fly, but will catch plenty of brown and rainbow trout in its own right.
You would think that a fly with such abilities would be well recognised here in Tassie, however if you asked ten fly fisherman about the Booby, I reckon about 8 or 9 of them would be thinking lingerie not fishing.

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