ifs lobsterThe recreational rock lobster season is closed from next Tuesday 1st May for:

all rock lobster in the Eastern Region; and
for females in the Western Region.

You must have rock lobster pots and rings off the water in the Eastern Region by midnight on Monday 30th April. You cannot transit to or from the Western Region around Whale Head with lobster or gear on board during the Eastern Region closed season.

The season for males in the Western Region remains open until 31 August 2018.

Check season dates

utas imasDR James Haddy from IMAS in Launceston is running a King George whiting frame donation research program. It appears that the adult whiting move out of the estuaries to spawn in deeper coastal areas up to 100m deep in April, and although he has sampled over 588 fish so far, he doesn’t have any mature/spawning fish captured in April. This is despite 7 years of sample collection. Information on adult whiting is important to assess the current minimum legal size of whiting in Tasmania. Currently, the smallest mature female recorded in Tasmania measured 37cm in total length with the next smallest individual measuring 40cm TL. What he needs is if anybody catches a whiting (particularly in coastal waters in APRIL) is to donate the fish frame for science. So instead of throwing the fish in the bin or back in the water after its been filleted.

devonport fisheries forumAll welcome at North West forum - 16 April 2018

Everyone is invited to our public forum in Devonport to discuss local recreational fishing issues and hear presentations from IMAS researchers and DPIPWE fishery managers.

Topics:

Bluespot and rock flathead, King George whiting, short fin pike, garfish and estuary perch - a snapshot of key recreational fish biology.
New fish, new fishing opportunities? A case study of Tasmanian kingfish.
Calamari - what's the catch? What we know about growth and spawning closures.
Rock lobster - what's happening in the far north west plus East Coast rebuilding.
Forum discussion - your questions answered.
DATE: Monday, 16 April, 6.30 - 8.00pm

VENUE: Mersey Yacht Club, 6 Anchor Drive, East Devonport

More information

devonport fisheries forumAll welcome at North West forum - 16 April

Everyone is invited to our public forum in Devonport to discuss local recreational fishing issues and hear presentations from IMAS researchers and DPIPWE fishery managers.

Topics:

  • Bluespot and rock flathead, King George whiting, short fin pike, garfish and estuary perch - a snapshot of key recreational fish biology.
  • New fish, new fishing opportunities? A case study of Tasmanian kingfish.
  • Calamari - what's the catch? What we know about growth and spawning closures.
  • Rock lobster - what's happening in the far north west plus East Coast rebuilding.
  • Forum discussion - your questions answered.

DATE: Monday, 16 April, 6.30 - 8.00pm

VENUE: Mersey Yacht Club, 6 Anchor Drive, East Devonport

More information

ifs trout jumpingHave you thought about going fishing? Fancy a feed of trout or salmon?

Easter is a great time to get back to nature and drop a line in the water. Recharge and enjoy the natural beauty that Tasmania has to offer.

With only a month of the brown trout open season to go – get out there and make the most of it.

The recent rain falling at Bronte Lagoon should see some water filling the mash creating a smorgasbord of drowned terrestrials for tailing fish.

fisheries tasScallop season is here

fisheries tas scallop

Who needs Easter eggs when there are scallops to be caught? The recreational season is now open except for the D'Entrecasteaux Channel.
Measuring gauges are available from Service Tasmania outlets.
Remember to measure and count scallops underwater as you dive. Highgrading your catch is not allowed, that is, you can't bring more than your daily bag limit of 50 scallops back to your boat and sort them there.

Scallop rules reminder


Flathead catch limits

willow sawflyWillow sawfly (Nematus oligospilus)

What is it?

Willow sawfl y is an insect which has recently arrived in Australia. The larval stage of the life cycle feeds on willow leaves, and large populations of larvae can defoliate adult willow trees.

Where did it come from?

Willow sawfl y is native to much of the northern hemisphere. It was fi rst recorded in South America in 1980, then in southern Africa in 1993 and New Zealand in 1997.

How did it get here?

It is unclear how willow sawfl y arrived in Australia, but it was not introduced deliberately. It is possible that adult sawfl ies were blown across from New Zealand or that cocoons were accidentally imported, for example on shipping containers. ..Read the PDF Flyer here

IMAS are looking for keen fishers to participate in their research angler logbook program. The logbook collects information on recreational catch including species caught, fish size and how many fish are kept or released. If you're interested please email Sean Tracey at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The logbook information provides important size and weight data that feeds into the Survey of Tasmanian Recreational Fishers to provide total catch estimates by weight.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

New to fishing in Tassie? Eleven different regional fishing maps are now available to download.

Features include: Where to Fish, What will I Catch and Local Fishing Facts. Plus a quick guide to Tassie fishing rules. Great for beginner fishers, tourists and families. Regions covered are:

East Coast, St Helens, the North East and Flinders Island;
Tamar Estuary, Devonport and Port Sorell, and the North West Coast;
Macquarie Harbour and King Island; and
Bruny D'Entrecasteaux Region, Derwent Estuary and the Tasman Peninsula

Hobart - Recreational Fishing in Tasmania for International Visitors and New Migrants
Fishers from culturally diverse backgrounds including Mandarin speakers are invited to an information session to learn more about fishing in Tasmania. Listen to talks from DPIPWE Fisheries, Fishcare Volunteers and Tasmania Marine Police officers and participate in practical workshops about identifying and measuring fish. English/Mandarin interpreters will be present.

Topics include:

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