"Damsels in Distress" on a New Zealand Stream

Damsels in distress on a New Zealand stream
Our colleague Simon Perkins recently honeymooned in New Zealand with his wife, Els, and he captured this amazing footage. Here’s how he explains it:

My wife and I were fishing with friend/guide Dean Whaanga in New Zealand when a combination of bad weather and good timing resulted in a fish giving us the experience of a lifetime. 

Opening Morning Pictures 2013

Pictures say a thousand words!

 
   

 Click Read More for full sized pictures.

Bridport Breaks

We are delivering equipment up to the Musselroe wind farm at the moment and there are so many streams on the way. So starting today, and every other day I go, I will slip the rod in. The chosen river this time was the one that runs into Bridport, it wasn't long before we had a fish on the bank, caught on KW galaxia.

Fish Taxidermy

Leroy Tirant

Once in a lifetime an angler may be lucky enough to catch a trophy fish, if you’re even luckier you may get more than one. When you catch this fish your faced with the question of what to do with it. In today’s age of catch and release many anglers would choose to release a big fish but there’s nothing wrong with having the fish mounted for your wall.

Opening weekend reports

Four Springs
Four Springs.. was like Sydney Harbour as Roger Mies and I took to the
water.. we counted 26 cars and boat trailers.. madness ! It was a cold
and calm morning with most angers seeming to catch a couple. We both
fly fished and ended up with 5 for our brief two hour session with all
coming to wet flies and all in fantastic condition; the rainbows were
all about 2 pound but resembled Sherrin Footballs and put on a huge
display ripping line off the reel.

Chasing Autumn Trout - April - May

by Chris Bassano
With one month of the regular ‘brown trout season’ remaining, good fishing is anything but over. There are a large number of productive fishing options left and in some instances, it may be the best you have had.
At this time of year brown trout begin to think about spawning. For lake fish this means ‘running’ up inflowing rivers to pair up and let loose. The trigger for this hysteria is rain and the subsequent fresh water. Whenever rain falls in quantities great enough to influence the flow of water into a lake at this time of year, trout sense that it is time for their annual pilgrimage and begin their long vidule. They begin to change colour, becoming darker and more vivid in colouration while congregating in large numbers.
By the end of March this year, more than three hundred fish were already in the fish traps in the Liawenee Canal and at the end of March a further 500 ran over the course of two days. This was a direct result of the rain that fell at this time. Although most fish move into the rivers at night, they mill around for some time in the bays into which these rivers flow before entering the mouth. This has huge ramifications for the fisherman. Some lakes and places within these lakes are more productive than others. Here are some of my favorite spots to visit in April.

Opening of the 2010-11 Trout Season

by Sarah Graham

The 2010-11 Angling Season, which is based on brown trout waters,
opens every year on the first Saturday in August. This year it falls
on Saturday the 7th, while rainbow waters remain closed until Saturday
2 October. Now is a good time to renew or buy an angling licence, to
prepare fishing gear and think about where to go on opening weekend or
to plan a fishing trip for early in the season.

Suggestions for Early Season Waters

by Sarah Graham

Many anglers are preparing for the opening of the new angling season on Saturday 7 August and it's shaping up to be another good one with the fishery in excellent health as a result of last year’s drought breaking rains. There are many great fishing locations around the State from which to choose for the opening weekend and early season fishing but here are a few suggestions.

Discovering new trout waters

Craig Rist
Tasmania has so much to offer the trout angler, from tiny mountain streams and lowland rivers, to lakes that are big enough to fish from a boat, along with hundreds of small lakes and tarns that will give you another reason to go bush walking.

Small streams are sweet

Mike Stevens gives some tips about fishing small streams for little fish.
I don’t particularly chase big fish. I like to catch them of course, but often I would rather catch ten small trout in a stream, rather than one big trout in a lake.
Recently I had some Victorian friends over and they also love the small northern streams. Fishing these predominately with small dry flies is such fun I can barely even begin to describe it. Most headwater streams have enough water and the eager little trout will come up and inspect your offerings.

It’s Summer time and the fishing is easy

Marty Wells
The difficulty (or easiness) of a fishery is relative and changing, a waterway may yield good results one day but for reasons unknown, completely shut down the next. There are however, a number of waters that consistently give up their fishy inhabitants more readily. One thing these waters have in common is a huge population of trout. Most trout fishers are aware of the fact that the bigger the fish population in any given water, the smaller the individual fish size. This is due to the finite amount of trout tucker available in any given waterway. Unfortunately, unless larger fish have been stocked into a lake these easier waters usually hold fish averaging closer to one pound than two. Having said that, big fish can turn up anywhere at any time. 

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