Fly Fishing April - May

Christopher Bassano

The end of April has traditionally brought about the conclusion of the trout fishing season for three months. More recently, things have changed and a few waters remain open year round. Amongst fly fishermen however, there is a perception that mid to late March coincides with the last of the "worth while" fishing. In reality, I believe the back end of any season can produce memorable fishing and after one as productive as this, those willing to brave the impending cold are likely to be well rewarded.

If I only had six flies

Can I please make it seven ed.?
Joe Riley
World Fly Fishing Championship angler Joe Riley takes a look at limiting his fly box to just six flies. Beginning and experienced anglers alike will find this a very useful study.

Mako shark on fly - are you crazy?

Craig Rist
Steve Hambleton and I have been fly-fishing mako and blue whaler sharks for the last eight years. In those early years we lost quite a few sharks while attempting to make an Australian salt-water fly-fishing record on 10 kg line class.

Increasing your success in mayfly hatches

Joe Riley
As you read this issue of Fishing and Boating News the mayflies of our Tasmanian waters are already listed in the specials on the menu board for our brown and rainbow trout. On clam afternoons the lowland rivers and lakes are already abuzz with red and black spinners, and the mayfly duns float adrift as the intermediate stage of this amazing insect makes its journey from nymph to spinner.

Five minutes with Muz Wilson - the River Gnome

Peter Hayes
Muz Wilson is perhaps Australia's best know fly tier and more importantly he is one of the most innovative fly designers on the planet.
Recently while Muz was visiting Tasmania and participating at a fly fishing workshop at our Cressy facility Mike Stevens was able to identify the importance of this man and his contribution to fly fishing. Mike has asked me to pen a few words about this remarkable individual.

Dry fly close to home

Joe Riley
It's amazing how close to home good dry fly fishing can be found. As summer comes along the lowland rivers start to offer some exhilarating, and often challenging dry fly fishing. From trout cruising the slow moving glides or pools sipping minuscule offerings out of the surface film, to excited  brown trout freely leaping from the water to catch mayfly and damselfly on the wing. These fish are catchable. With a little patience, intelligent fly choice, a good  leader setup and accurate casting they can be brought undone, and once two or three of these fish come to the net you can really feel a sense of satisfaction about achieving a challenging task.

Fly lines explained

Peter Hayes
I am in the middle of my flycasting course season, and as I sit here making up the 120th practice line on to the reel I got to thinking. fly lines really are much more than "coloured string" as I often call them.

Sinking fly lines for early season success

Joe Riley
Joe Riley is as keen an angler as they come. With the opening season approaching he can barely sleep. Joe has fished in many competitions and in this article he reveals a few of his tips on how to maximise your results during the early part of the season with sinking fly lines.

Fly fishing during autumn in northern Tasmania.

Nick Voce.
The autumn season brings with it a certain kind of sadness. For me, the changing colours of the autumn leaves are a reminder that only a few weeks remain before the majority of Tasmania's trout-fishing waters will be closed for the spawning season.

Fly fishing in October/November - Tasmanian Northern Lowlands

Nick Voce
Some beautiful weather at this time of year has provided conditions that can only highlight the enjoyment of our favourite outdoor pursuits. Many of us will be encouraged to venture forth and pursue our fabulous trout.

The bizarre Booby - a great import

Joe Riley
Anyone who has picked up an English fly fishing magazine will have read about the virtues of the Booby. This bizarre looking fly has been around the lake fly fishing scene in England for close on twenty years. In this time it has become one of the "must have" patterns in fly boxes for everyone from rank beginners to the top competition anglers. The Booby is a fly that can be fished on every line from a super fast sinker to a floating line, it can be used for very specific purposes as a sacrificial fly, but will catch plenty of brown and rainbow trout in its own right.
You would think that a fly with such abilities would be well recognised here in Tassie, however if you asked ten fly fisherman about the Booby, I reckon about 8 or 9 of them would be thinking lingerie not fishing.

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