Hello everyone, I thought it would be a good time to introduce myself.

My name is Stephen Smith and I have been managing the website tasfish.com since May 2009.

It has been an epic journey of learning and discovery and I am indebted to Mike Stevens for his help, support and patience.

I am developing a new venture Rubicon Web and Technology Training ( www.rwtt.com.au ). The focus is two part, to develop websites for individuals and small business and to train people to effectively use technology in their everyday lives.

Please contact me for further information.

Stephen Smith

Marvellous mayfly fishing in Tasmanian Lakes

The mayfly has been closely associated with Spring and fly-fishing in the northern hemisphere for hundreds of years.
Claudius Aelianus the author of a book on natural history written in the fifth century writes of tackle and fly making. While translated from Greek, the message is clear, the process was already well developed in Macedonian rivers. One can still get a glimpse of these early times and an appreciation of their enthusiasm. Advances in the development of better equipment and methods for their sport could only have been bred through free thinking. The earliest flies were tied from furs and feathers, many of which are still included in modern dressings, to represent mayflies and the immature nymphs. These were undoubtedly fished wet fly style in rivers and streams using relatively crude poles and horsehair lines.

Targeting Lake Trout with Soft Plastics

Steve Steer
Introduction: In August 2003 I fulfilled one of my life long goals, to move from suburban Melbourne to the greener fishing pastures of Tasmania. I had been traveling to Tasmania since I was 12 years old on holidays and had spent many hours over the years chasing one of my favorite species, the wily Tasmanian trout. Having been a soft plastic lure fanatic for many years and now only living 10 minutes from some of the best trout waters in the world, has given me the incentive to refine my skills at catching this species with soft lures. What follows is a detailed description of the rigs and techniques that I have found to be extremely successful when targeting trout in Tasmanian lakes.

Craigbourne Dam

The 24 m high concrete Craigbourne Dam was constructed across the Coal River in 1986 to provide irrigation water for the rural districts of Campania and Richmond. While it cannot compare to the highland lakes, it is located less than 1 hour from Hobart and has become a very popular trout fishing venue.

Popular Lakes and Rivers

In this second instalment of the second eleven, guide and author Neil Grose takes you to some often ignored bays on the most popular of lakes, some rivers hidden underneath the collective nose of Launceston, and a couple of lakes that deserve more patronage than they currently receive.

Lake Naomi

by Robert Gott

Lake Naomi is located on Curena Creek and is representative of the myriad of lakes and tarns in Tasmania's Central Plateau Conservation Area (CPCA). It offers the special wilderness fishing experience so unique to this part of the island state.

Bronte Lagoon - Tasmania's fishing centre

Bronte Lagoon is the most centrally situated water in Tasmania. It fishes very well throughout the year, but one must vary the techniques used. This profile is by Greg French and Rob Sloane and was first published in their book "Trout Guide", which is still available at book and tackle stores. Thanks also go to Harold Cornelius and Denis Wiss for their help.

Do we underestimate our Redfin Perch

The Redfin as it is known to most Tasmanians is not favoured by many anglers - although there is no reason why this should be so. The Redfin will take flies, lures and bait readily and is quite good to eat. A lot of anglers consider it a nuisance good ENGLISH PERCH (Redfin-Perca fluviatilis) According to a Royal Commission report on the fisheries of Tasmania issued in 1882-3, the English Perch was first introduced to Tasmania in 1862 by two brothers, Morton and Curzon Allport.

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