Presented from Issue 95
Recent kayak popularity It was over 25 years, maybe 30 years ago, when I first saw someone fishing from water level in a boat. On a dark and windy night much to my amusement my mate John Rumph waddled into Lake Toolondo in the Grampians on a horrid night standing in what I think was the first ever float tube imported into Australia.

Presented from Issue 95
Huntsman Lake lies approximately 20 km south of Deloraine. It’s an easy, scenic drive via the small town of Meander. As most anglers know, the lake is only a few years old. It was formed in 2007 with the construction of the Meander Dam. The lake is fed by the Meander River and also by several small streams.

Presented from Issue 95
These days fishing techniques and fishing tackle just keep making more advances and becoming much more technical. I know I have fallen into that trap myself. I’ve just added a GPS to my arsenal, so that I can mark waypoints for hotspots. I also have a fish finder installed. Some kayakers even have high end fish finders with dual beam, side imaging, big colour screens and inbuilt GPS. The same kind of set up you’d see on a well laid out bream or trout boat.

Presented from Issue 94

Little Swanport is about one hour from Hobart and a little less than half way between Triabunna and Swansea. It is probably my number one saltwater kayak fishing spot. The reasons for that include:

Presented from Issue 94

The Great Lake is one of my favourite places to fish for trout in Tassie. It supports a large population of both rainbow and brown trout and the vast size of the lake means means that I can hunt for these trout with very few interruptions.

Winter fishing at the lake has been good to me this year; however, many of the fish that I have caught have been in poor or ‘slabby’ condition and have not put up much of a fight. Catching a brown trout that is half asleep and resembles an eel is not my idea of fun. No doubt the availability of food has a lot to do with this.