Game fishing Tasmania

Mason Paull
I have been game fishing in Tasmania for about 18 years. With the onset of the warm East Australian current, most game fishers eagerly await the first of our target game species, albacore, stripey tuna, yellowfin tuna, striped marlin, mako sharks, blue sharks and so on. This article is a guide to the game fisher who is just starting out.

Tassie Yellowfin Tuna

Mason Paull
The yellowfin tuna is one of the great sport and game fish of tthe world. Thunnus Albacares is sought after by all tassie game fishermen and is highest standard, which we all would like the achieve. The power and beauty of these fish is something you will not forget once you have done battle with one of these powerful tuna. Sadly these tuna are plundered all down the east coast of Australia and around the world. These tuna are apex predators, meaning they are near the top of the food chain, they will eat anything that crosses their path. Their main diet consists of slimey mackeral, jack mackeral, pilchards and number one on their menu is sauries. They also will follow trawlers around and eat trawler trash that is thrown over the side of these boats.

Bluefin mania continues

Brown Dog!

Here we are into June and the game-fishing season is well and truly in full swing in the south, but not just the south. Over the past month we have seen many albacore in the 15 - 20 kilo range caught off St.Helens - not to mention the huge Australian record bluefin that weighed in at an incredible 153 kilo's. But it is in the south of the state that anglers are really having a ball!
Eaglehawk Neck is on fire as those anglers that fished the recent Southern Bluefin Championships found out. I am not aware of a single boat that didn't land multiple bluefin for the competition and organisers even ran out of "catch & release" tags on the first day, certainly the best competition to have been held out of "The Neck" for many years.

Land Based Game Fishing

Simon Kernan

Thinking back to the day before, and the 3½ hour hike through the bush, I wondered if today was going to be any different from the many trips before to this location.

The bluefin cometh

Cool currents
As the weather cools and sea temperatures slow start to decline, preparations (and hopes) turn toward the possibility of another good blue fin tuna run. Digressing momentarily, I received a phone call from Leroy at Big Fin Sports fishing. The result of conversation was the Land Based Game article, I previously mentioned was placed in the hands of "Simon" who without doubt has LBG miles on the board both here and interstate.  Simon has had some fantastic captures including a few good Kingfish captures from places here in Tasmania and is indelibly qualified on the subject matter.
So again at short notice I was again asked to stab my little sausages on the keyboard and come up with an article for aspiring anglers chasing blue fin tuna. The article is a follow up with technical information and is again aimed squarely between the eyes of the more beginner, novice or inexperienced blue water wanderers.

Chasing chooks

Tim Anderson takes a look at one of the mainstays of Tasmania's gamefishing. Albacore are not as regal as marlin, yellowfin or bluefin, but they are fun to catch and great to eat.

The build up
What smells like fish and tastes like chicken? This question has so often been asked by the likes of Cheech and Chong and although the very term conjures up images of "hedgehogs" and alley cats, rarely has the question been posed in this arena.

The answer I am looking for in this forum is obviously albacore tuna.

Pedra Branca Bluefin Bonanza

Tim Anderson

Tim Anderson tells the tale of an extraordinary fishing event-fishing for Southern bluefin tuna off Tasmania's south east coast.

GAME & SPORT FISHING WITH SOFT PLASTICS

By Starlo & Bushy*

* This feature article is based on extracts from Starlo & Bushy's great how-to book "On Soft Plsastics", published in 2005 by AFN Publishing of Melbourne.

At first glance, fast-swimming pelagic species such as tailor, salmon, trevally, tuna and mackerel might seem to be the least likely candidates for successful soft plastic fishing. In actual fact, nothing could be further from the truth.

NORTH COAST MAKO's

Harry Murfet

An exciting new sport fishery has emerged and it adds another dimension to the usual bread and butter fishing that is associated with Tasmania's North Coast.
Mako sharks have always been present in Bass Strait waters but it is only in recent years that a few innovative anglers, sick of catching couta, pike, salmon and flathead, decided to target these gamefish. In doing so, becoming pioneers of Bass Strait game fishing.
Makos are a pelagic species, roaming the ocean in search of food that consists of squid and, in the case of Bass Strait, school fish like mackerel, salmon, mullet and couta. While most North Coast makos are juveniles in the 30 - 50 kg. range, there are plenty of reports of fish hooked, lost and landed over the 100 kg mark this year.

It's Bluefin Time Again!


Once again it's that time of year when avid game fishermen pull out their gear and give it the once over in anticipation of the arrival of the mighty southern bluefin tuna. These powerhouse fish put both angler skill and product quality to the ultimate test each year and anglers look forward to the challenge.

Low Head Makos

Mako sharks are not a species I would normally chase, and especially not at the mouth of the Tamar River. That is until Andrew Hart off Hook Line and Sinker caught the first mako shark taken on rod and reel off Low Head last season.

Go to top
JSN Boot template designed by JoomlaShine.com