From the Archives ...

Trout tips - from tackle shops

Presented from Issue 105, August 2013

We did a bit of a runaround Tasmania’s tackle stores to see what their tips for the first month or so of the tackle season were. We asked what the top three places to fish were, plus lures, flies, baits and a few other things.
Here is a rundown on their answers Whenever, and wherever you fish - anywhere, or for any fish in the world - ask the locals and especially ask at the local tackle store. They know what was caught today, yesterday and on what.

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Please check all relevant authorities before fishing - www.ifs.tas.gov.au and dpipwe.tas.gov.au . Don't forget issuu.com/stevenspublishing for years of back issues !

2016 12 yamaha f25 bYamaha Motor Australia is excited to announce the release of the highly-anticipated four-stroke, 25 horsepower outboard engine, the all-new lightweight F25 EFI. This fantastic addition to Yamaha’s four-stroke line up continues Yamaha’s proud tradition of producing exceptional small motors designed for durability, reliability and above all else, enjoyable time on the water. The new F25 is around 25% lighter and has been engineered for skippers who expect the very best in features, performance and efficiency from their small outboard.

The new F25 has been developed to exceed the performance and features of Yamaha’s 25N two-stroke, a motor that offered excellent performance and highly reliable operation that has powered Australian boaters for decades as well as improve on Yamaha’s existing F25. The all-new F25 has achieved all this and more. Its four-stroke, fuel injected design delivers even better performance and the kind of fuel economy that makes small boating affordable and extremely satisfying.

Seasons Greetings. The Wild Fisheries Management Branch wish fishers a safe and happy holiday period. Keep safe and check the weather before heading out. Happy Fishing !

Information published from : http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/sea-fishing-aquaculture/

rock lobster 2016 12 09Article sourced from http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/sea-fishing-aquaculture/sustainable-fisheries-management/Biotoxin-Fishery-Events

Maria Island Zone (Wineglass Bay to Marion Bay)
Monitoring of PST levels in rock lobster samples taken from the Maria Island Zone have returned results that will enable the rock lobster fishery in this zone to open on Sunday, 11 December 2016.
Pots may be set in the Maria Island Zone area from 13:00 hours (i.e. 1pm) on Saturday 10 December 2016, however pots cannot be hauled or lobster taken until Sunday 00:01 hours (i.e. Sunday morning).

Presented from Issue 94

Sea run trout are somewhat of an enigma for many Tasmanian and travelling anglers. Our population are mostly comprised of brown trout which, by definition, choose to live most of their lives at sea. These fish then come into our estuary systems twice a year in order to feed (August – November) and to spawn (April – June). The best time to chase them is during the early months of the season when site fishing is a very real possibility.

Presented from Issue 94

Little Swanport is about one hour from Hobart and a little less than half way between Triabunna and Swansea. It is probably my number one saltwater kayak fishing spot. The reasons for that include:

Presented from Issue 94

The Great Lake is one of my favourite places to fish for trout in Tassie. It supports a large population of both rainbow and brown trout and the vast size of the lake means means that I can hunt for these trout with very few interruptions.

Winter fishing at the lake has been good to me this year; however, many of the fish that I have caught have been in poor or ‘slabby’ condition and have not put up much of a fight. Catching a brown trout that is half asleep and resembles an eel is not my idea of fun. No doubt the availability of food has a lot to do with this.

Presented from Issue 94

Fumbling around in the dark I finally found the mobile phone and switched off the alarm. The 3wt was set up with a new fly (I like to have a brand new fly on at the start of each fishing trip. It makes no difference to catch rates, only in my head!) and the contents of the pack checked last night. Now its time to get out of bed, have the usual hot Milo and put the waders on. That is of course after the warm thermal layers have gone on.

Presented from Issue 94

With the cold and wet winter days now behind us, as we move into the peak of spring, we can look forward to some truly spectacular fishing ahead.

As Matt Byrne details here, mid-late spring is the prime time to hit our popular coastal estuaries and rivers in search of our iconic sport fishing species – the southern black bream.

Presented from Issue 94

Tasmania has some of beautiful rivers from small slow flowing waters to large rivers such as the Huon and Derwent.

In this article we are going to take it back to the basics and explain the different lures and techniques for catching trout in these waters.

Despite your level of experience our streams offer fabulous lure fishing. You need to expect that one minute you will be fishing deep pools and 20 metres further down the river you might only have half a metre of water. The lures you use need to take this into account.

Presented from Issue 94

After a short drive from home I pulled into the parking area I frequently use adjacent to a bridge spanning the Mersey River, my old friend. The first priority, as always, was to walk onto the bridge to have a look at the river conditions. This revealed that things were looking good with the late afternoon sun revealing a mixture of mayfly spinners and white caddis in the air above the rippling river in the soft October light. The mayfly spinners were especially noticeable with the sun glinting through their iridescent wings as they danced en-masse. Swallows, fantails and wrens were also on the wing taking advantage of the easy meal on offer. A splash or two in the river below indicated that another predator had noticed the insects as well!

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