Please check all relevant authorities before fishing - www.ifs.tas.gov.au and dpipwe.tas.gov.au . Don't forget issuu.com/stevenspublishing for years of back issues !

115 fish more fly boxPresented from Issue 115, April 2015
Well this season is passing before my eyes. Maybe I’ve been working too conscientiously, but for some reason I have fished less this last season than in recent years. There are still some golden Autumn fishing to be had, if I can make it out there, but even here on the mainland, where the rivers are open until early June, the dry fly action slows right down by the end of April. With that in mind, I’m already thinking of what I might do differently next season.

115 last cast trout2Presented from Issue 115, April 2015

While the action on the saltwater has been okay, the Tasmanian trout season has been far from great. Over the summer, I have fished many of the highland lakes, using both dry fly and micro-sized plastics. Although some of my trips have been productive, there have been many trips where I have put in long hours and plenty of effort, for only a few fish. It is with particular sadness, that Arthurs Lake - my favourite place to fish, has also let me down on a number of occasions. As with any fishing trip, I always endeavour to find a ‘silver lining’, and for me it has been that the few fish I have caught were noticeably larger, and in better condition, than the ones I caught the previous year.

North coast

The southern calamari and squid fisheries will be closed to recreational and commercial fishing on Tasmania's north coast from 1 - 31 October 2018 inclusive.

The closure of the entire North Coast is to protect spawning calamari. During the closure period, taking or possessing calamari and other squid species is prohibited in the closed area - see map below.

 

East Coast

Dates for the annual calamari closure in upper south east coast waters including Great Oyster Bay and Mercury Passage are unchanged, from 15 October to 14 November inclusive.

Soft shell clams alert

An introduced soft-shell clam was recently detected on a beach near Orford in south east Tasmania. Biosecurity Tasmania is now managing the incursion of this species in accordance with national marine pest protocols. For more information see the Biosecurity Tasmania website.

From today, Wednesday 11 July, taking and possessing soft shelled clams in state waters is prohibited. This is to help prevent the spread of the clam to other areas.

If you sight a suspected soft-shell clam, do not move it, instead contact Biosecurity Tasmania on phone 6165 3777 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.?. A photo will assist with identification.

 

Soft shell clam



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Recreational Fisheries Section, DPIPWE
Phone: 1300 720 647
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: www.fishing.tas.gov.au

with members of the 2018 Australian Commonwealth Fly Fishing Team, in association with Hayes on Brumbys - Cressy, Tasmania.

Join members of the Australian Fly Fishing Team for a coaching and guiding clinic in Tasmania. We request a $1200 donation (tax deductible through the Australian Sports Foundation) includes expenses - accomodation and meals @ Hayes on Brumbys.

Please note there are a limited number of participants!

115 flathead headPresented from Issue 115, April 2015
Heading home I take a hand off the wheel every now and then, rub my index finger over my thumb and smile.

Torn skin rough from lip gripping seven or more giant flathead. Picked up, photographed, and slipped back into Duck Bay.

A mission ‘long dreamed’, since the first time I pulled up at the jetty in Smithton a few years back. “Jeez. This looks fishy.”

And so, on a late-March weekend it happened. I’d found time away from the family, pieced together a little bit of local knowledge, cruised the web. Mike printed out satellite pics of low tide – the mysterious waterway undressed, exposing oyster leases, channels and drains.

115 plastic starloPresented from Issue 115, April 2015
Lots of anglers seem to be deeply challenged when it comes to selecting that first soft plastic to tie on at a new location, or even to start a new day’s fishing at a well-known spot. In this feature I want to share with you some basic rules of thumb that will greatly ease the burden of this important decision making process:

Over the course of a year, I get to talk to a lot of soft plastics fishers from around the country. Some I meet at seminars and shows. Others I chat with via the various pages on Facebook that I run or help to administer (especially the StarloFishing and Squidgy Soft Plastics pages), or through my blogs on www.starlofishing.com Still others send their letters or emails to me via the various magazines I write for. However, no matter what the source of the enquiry, one question (or variations of it) dominates the calls for advice that I receive. Typically, that query begins with the words: “What’s the best soft plastic to use for…?”

115 jettyBPresented from Issue 115, April 2015
The boys had been pestering me for quite some time, ‘dad can we go out to Port Sorell and have a fish off the jetty soon’. Admittedly I had been trying to put it off, I didn’t like to tell them but I was a bit out of my comfort zone with the whole jetty/saltwater fishing thing. I could happily take them anywhere in the state and confidently fish for a trout or two, but this was different. But and it was a big but, the time had come to give them what they wanted. Please keep in mind as you read on that I am merely just a fly fisherman who loves his trout with virtually no conventional gear saltwater experience. But, I am a father who wants his two boys to grow up experiencing as many different fishing opportunities as possible. Then they can decide which fishing path they want to wander thru life exploring.

Back issues of Tasmanian Fishing and Boating News are available at Issuu

Issue 131 from February is available for free to read at Issuu

Yamaha V8 425 XTOOnce again Yamaha has set the benchmark in bringing innovative, big horsepower outboards to the market with the launch of the new V8 425 XTO (Extreme Offshore) outboard.

This massive 425-horsepower V8 engine has been designed from the ground up to deliver extreme power and thrust, combined with a fully integrated power and control system to create a whole new level of boating experience.

Powered by a big bore, 5.6 litre, naturally aspirated engine, the V8 425 XTO has been engineered to drive large props for maximum thrust. Jason Harris, Yamaha Motor Australia’s Marine Manager said, “This revolutionary outboard opens up a whole new class of large outboard driven boats, delivering a more reliable, fuel efficient and extremely powerful engine solution for offshore fishing, pleasure, commercial and tourism boats.”

2018 04 29 Leven River 6315Seeing it's the last day of the 2017-18 trout season I headed back to the Leven River to finish off what's been a reasonably good trout season for me and maybe add a few more trout to my seasons tally. As I got closer to Gunns Plains I noticed there was a large layer of fog running along the whole length of the river so it won't be all that warm once I get there. With no wind it will still be nice in the river and hopefully there will be a few trout in the area I'm fishing today below & above Marshall's Bridge. It wasn't very long before I was there and headed of for a five to six hundred meter walk downstream where I would hop in the river and slowly fish my way back upstream. It was quite weird walking in the thick fog and the only sounds I heard was from several birds singing, magpies warbling and of course a few cows bellowing away every so often.

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