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Fishing Highlights, August to September Daniel Hackett

The majority of Tasmanian fishers think of themselves as a relatively tough bunch, "any harder they'd rust', battling relentless snow, rain and sun (somebody has to do it). Despite the obvious ruggedness of the fishers in question, the battle hardened Taswegian trouter is more likely to be found tucked up in bed eating Nan's chicken soup during August and September rather then on the water. This is a pity because any time is a good time to go fishing, and August and September are no exceptions. Pack away your blouses, pull on a beanie and try a few of these highlights!

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When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing -

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112 redfin michalPresented from Issue 112, October 2014
It is that time of the year when the weather starts to warm up and the freshwater fishing scene jumps into action. The trout have finished spawning and there is, once again, an abundance of natural food. It is a great time for both the fly fishermen and the budding lure angler!

As many of you search for trout at this time of the year, you are also very likely to encounter that pesky little creature commonly referred to as the ‘redfin perch’. These fish are renowned for taking your fly, lure or whatever you may throw in the water. They can be a royal pain in the bum at times, literally hooking up on every cast.

112 crescent zotchPresented from Issue 112, October 2014

Almost certainly home to Tasmania’s biggest trout, Lake Crescent is seeing a resurgence in popularity. A chequered past has seen this lake through quite a few ups and downs.

For many years it was a hunting ground for anglers using galaxiids for bait. They would row the bait out on a ‘long line’ then it was back to a camp on the shore and wait. Often enough nothing would happen, but occasionally the reward would be massive.

In 1973 Billy Zotch landed a huge fish that after gutting, reportedly weighed 33 pounds. A report at the time said Billy had to kill and gut it to stop the fish flapping around and swamping the small boat they were in. The massive brown was caught on a Big Bat lure.

2019 ffcAustralia will to host the 39th FIPS- Mouche World Fly Fishing championships in Tasmania in late November 2019.

More information is available on the recently released web site This web site will be updated from time to time as we progress to the event.

An information brochure, has been produced, which outlines the event and calls for volunteers hosts and others. The brochure can be found here.

111 bait lure adrianPresented from Issue 111, August 2014

Well another season is upon us once more and early season fishing can run hot and cold for this time of the year. With the season start still being in Winter we are still going to have quite a bit of inclement weather to put up with for a month or two. Cold, windy and wet days at times making fishing conditions very hard and every fish well earned for those who tough it out.

Then there will be the very clear, cold frosty mornings when the temperature is so low that the water from the line freezes in the rod eyelets preventing one from retrieving the line back in after a few casts with the lure. For those of us who love trout fishing rivers, well that’s just something we take in our stride. Remember to be well rugged up, that’s the main thing, and really you don’t have to get up and be on the water at first light this early in the season either. Well I don’t any way, I start around 9.00 am and still get a good catch on most trips.

111 jellybeansPresented from Issue 111, August 2014

By the end of the brown trout season I’m usually ready for a change, try to catch a tuna, stock up on some flathead or garfish. But by the first weekend in August I am refreshed and ready to go again. Early season is a great time of year in Tasmanian lakes, high water levels with cruising browns in shallow water, wet fly polaroiding, fishing with sinking lines to get to weed beds where the fish are holding and feeding, all great ways to catch an early season fish.

We all have our favourite flies and some great early season patterns. These are a few I like to fish early in the season.

111 janPresented from Issue 111, August 2014
Writing for the start of the season is a delight and full of anticipation. What will the new season bring? As I write this I am finishing a coffee in my front room looking out over Great Lake.

Two parrots are noisily pulling the bark back on a small gum tree in front of the house and I can only assume they are looking for and finding some insects of some sort — perhaps gum beetles are on their menu. I don’t imagine there is too much else around.

111 arthurs troutPresented from Issue 111, August 2014
The beginning of the new trout season is finally here in Tassie! While temperatures are still very cold around the state, many anglers may choose to wait until the weather improves. For those keen anglers, such as myself, who remain undeterred by such weather conditions, the search for that first trout of the season begins.

The Central Highland lakes are always productive early in the season and one of my favourites is Arthurs Lake. This season, I plan to explore more places on this lake using my Hobie fishing kayak. It really is the perfect craft to get into areas where boats can’t. I have also learnt that such ‘hard to reach’ places often hold the best fish.

 111 pet guide
 The Guide Dam is a beautiful place

Presented from Issue 111, August 2014
The Pet and Guide dams are both great waters on the North West Coast, often people over look these great waters. They yield good numbers of fish all year round but they fish exceptionally well for the first month to two months of the trout season.

To use the correct nomenclature they are reservoirs, but anglers refer to them as dams, so that is what I have done.

The Pet Dam is especially great for family fishing trips and the beginner angler. With access being suitable for the young, elderly and close flat areas are available for the physically impaired. It’s a large open area with plenty of room for the kids to run about with a great opportunity to land a rainbow trout or brown trout.

111 early headwatersPresented from Issue 111, August 2014

Tackling early season trout is a totally different proposition to fishing during the mild, calm conditions we had at the end of April. Fish have now spawned and are looking to put condition on, while the cooler weather of Spring is not conducive to insect hatches. Water temperatures are very low and levels are high. All of these things require different tactics. I will not discuss sea trout as they run and feed off a totally different set of circumstances. I will concentrate instead on inland lakes and rivers.

Trout seem to feed best in water temperatures of around 16 degrees, but you are not going to find much warm water in August and September. Having said that, I don’t believe that there is such a things as being ‘too cold to catch a fish’ as long as the water isn’t frozen over. Although water temperatures are far from ideal, a change of tactics will still bring results. Don’t expect enormous bags of fish but certainly enough to make it worthwhile.

Presented from Issue 111, August 2014
Anti-kinks are a unique piece of inexpensive tackle. They can be very useful used correctly. By definition they are design to stop your line twisting and developing ‘kinks’ which are the result of line twist.

As a rule I tend to go by the KISS principal. Keep It Simple Stupid. That is to have as little clutter as possible on my line at all times. Line tied directly to the lure or snap and that’s it. But there are times when it is necessary to use an anti-kink.

There are several different types, mostly plastic for want of a better word, although there are weighted lead, aluminium and brass version floating around but these tend to be older styles. All are designed to act as a keel and track straight through the water. All are shaped like a semi-circle or half-moon probably the best description.

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