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Suggestions for Early Season Waters

Suggestions for Early Season Waters

by Sarah Graham

Many anglers are preparing for the opening of the new angling season on Saturday 7 August and it's shaping up to be another good one with the fishery in excellent health as a result of last year’s drought breaking rains. There are many great fishing locations around the State from which to choose for the opening weekend and early season fishing but here are a few suggestions.

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Sight fishing for bream

by Isaac Harris.
Most of my fishing for bream is done after I see them. Casting to ‘sighted’ fish is the greatest thrill ever! Polaroiding for trout is common enough, but my passion is bream – from the shore. I’m going to explain the highs and techniques of sight fishing in this article.
Being a school kid in Hobart, without a car to tow a boat, restricts me to fishing shore-based or ‘shorebashing’ as many call it, whilst dad (transport) is working. Mostly I fish weekends and holidays or any chance I get really. No matter where I get dropped off, or whatever time, I usually get to see some unbelievable stuff in the good weather, but also the bad.
This article relates mostly to the Derwent River, but applies to similar waters all around Tasmania.

BREAM WANTED

 


 Researchers at the AMC are investigating the influence of environmental later conditions on bream growth and survival. As a recreational fisher we would like you to participate as a recreational research angler.  Next time you go fishing for bream and keep a few, place your frames in a plastic bag with a label stating the date, capture estuary, your name and contact details. 

Mike Stevens and Leroy Tirant Win first Tasmanian Bream Classic for 2010

Round 1 Tasmanian Bream Fishing Classics

After a year off for both Mike Stevens and Leroy Tirant joined up for the first time and came back with a vengance. A well executed plan started with a comprehensive look around Georges Bay on Friday prefish.

James Haddy - the Bream Doctor

Bream'in with passion - by Dan Clifton
Passion for bream? Well if you have ever had the chance to just watch a bream do its thing, you will start to understand why they are the most addictive small fin fish in Australia. Not only are they tough on light gear, they are extremely intelligent and mysterious. Bream, like many species, proffer many questions. It is when you start to search for answers that you start to realise the truth behind the fact that we know more about the moon than we do ocean, and it is in our backyard.

Starlo's breamin essentials

Steve Starling
With several important BREAM Tournaments coming up on the Tasmanian calendar, we figured it was high time to hear from a regular competitor on how he prepares for these events. In addition to being one of the country's most prolific angling journalists and TV presenters, Steve Starling is a high-profile regular in the ABT's National BREAM Series, and a former top-three cash prize money earner on the circuit. He was also NSW Team Captain in 2001 and 2002, NSW BREAM Angler of the Year (AOY) in 2001, NSW AOY runner-up in 2002, Victorian AOY in 2002 and is a dual National BREAM Circuit tournament round winner. So, when Starlo talks about his list of "essential" gear for competing in these events, it pays to listen! Here's what he had to say when we asked him about this important subject:

Unlocking the secrets of bream sex

Dr James Haddy

Dr James Haddy is a lecturer for the Australian Maritime College at Beauty Point. Over the past 10 yrs he has actively researched a variety of aspects of the biology and physiology of black bream. Below is a brief summary of some of his findings on reproduction in black bream.

Understanding the movement patterns of bream

Ryuji Sakabe and Jeremy Lyle

Over the past decade the sporting qualities of black bream have been recognised increasingly amongst Tasmanian anglers, as has the overall quality of the Tasmanian fishery. Unlike mainland states, the commercial sale of bream is prohibited in Tasmania, effectively achieving recreational-only status for the species and avoiding many of the problems of overfishing experienced elsewhere.
In this article PhD student Ryuji Sakabe and Dr Jeremy Lyle of the Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute (TAFI) report initial findings of a research project tracking movements of black bream in the Little Swanport Estuary, a popular bream fishing area. This project is part of a wider study of bream ecology and was supported through funding provided by the Fishwise Community Grants scheme.

Six pound trophy bream

Steve Robinson
Damon Sherriff is a great friend of mine. We often speak for hours about fishing. The moon, tide, the barometer, rigs, bait and water temperature. Our wives don't understand and never will.

Targeting Bream with Soft Plastics

Introduction
In the last ten years or so, the humble bream has turned from a bread and butter species that was predominantly targeted by anglers using baits such as shrimp, prawns, crabs, bass yabbies/nippers, blood worms, sand worms, etc, into a highly prized sports fish that is now being targeted with great success by anglers using lure and fly.

Bream Fishing with Squidgies

Local Tasmanians don't realise how good their bream fishery is. It is a fishery that has changed little over many years and in fact recent reports have confirmed in some places it is getting better. I am not sure when commercial fishing stopped for bream, but it has been many, many years.

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