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Atlantic Salmon At Large

Atlantic Salmon At Large

Recently Atlantic salmon seems to be a very hot topic amongst local anglers, especially those in the south of the state in the D'Entrecasteaux area. Northern anglers should take a close look at the Tamar as there are opportunities here as well.  
The recent "great escape" has provided a perfect opportunity for fresh and saltwater anglers alike to experience some truly memorable sport. Tasmania's pristine, clean and cool waters are the perfect nursery for the Atlantic Salmon and as our local fish farms produce more and more fresh quality seafood it is a fact that there are going to be tangible consequences.

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Jan’s Flies

Well here we are again looking at the doldrum time of
year when our fishing slows down somewhat.
As I write this in early May there are our first snow scuffs
hurrying past the window – a taste of things to come.
There are a few lakes still open and these waters can
fish well if you are willing to put up the elements so go
prepared for the worst the weather gods can throw at
you.
If there is a frost overnight and we get one of those
lovely still mornings when the slicks form and collect midge
into that lovely smooth water.
Even though it’s very cold the fish will still look up if
the food is there.
Midge will work their way up from the bottom very
slowly and will often get trapped in the surface film it’s
at this stage they are very vulnerable to the trout. I have
seen trout swimming along in a slick with their mouths
open just skimming the pupa off the top. At other times
the fish can become very selective. So be prepared for
some fussy fish.
Like many other fly patterns there are a number for
midge some like very small patterns others will tie them
on the larger side so I tie with a happy medium. The only
thing that I am a little bit fussy about is the type of hook.
A buzzer hook is my choice instead of a straight shank
it is slightly rounded giving the fly a more realistic body
shape.
Midge
Hook: Buzzer hook size 10-16
Thread: Black
Rib: Very fine silver wire
Body: One slim peacock herl
Wing buds: Tip of a turkey biots in red or
orange
Breathing filaments: White foam
Method
1. Take thread well round the bend of the hook.
2. Tie in fine silver wire and then one slim peacock herl.
Bring thread forward leaving enough room behind the
eye for other material.
3. Bring peacock herl forward and tie off with thread, cut
away any excess. Now bring rib forward with nice even
turns to create a nice segmented look to the body, cut
away excess wire.
4. Cut a slim slip of white foam and tie in cross ways
similar to a wing. I find this gives the fly stability.
Depending on the size of the hook you are using, trim
the foam to suit.
5. Form a small head, whip finish, cut thread away and
varnish.
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