From the Archives ...

 

The season that was

Todd Lambert, President of the Longford Anglers Club, takes a look at the past trout season for both himself and his club members.

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When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

Small streams are sweet

I never kill many fish; not because I believe the fishery won't stand
it, but more because they aren't welcome at home. My wife has a strong
aversion to the smell of fish around the house and sometimes when I
get some flathead and cook it on the BBQ out the back she can still
smell it. She is fine with it in a restaurant, but it is just any hint
of fishy smell is a big no-no.

Scamander River - Springtime Bream

One of Jamie Henderson's favourite times of the year on the East Coast is the late spring months of October and November. It's at this time that the everyday angler can experience some of the best bream fishing in Tasmania on the Scamander River, a mere 15 minute drive south of St Helens. The bream spawn during the spring months and by late spring are in large numbers throughout the river system. They are hungry, ready for action and can be caught on bait, lures and fly. The river is easily accessed by small boat and in the lower reaches offers excellent shore based fishing for those without a watercraft or with the family in tow.

Macquarie River Mayfly Spinners

Craig Rist

Watching a trout of any size take your dry fly is something you never tire of. From the moment the fly disappears in a swirl, time seems to stop, as you wait for those crucial seconds to pass before lifting the rod to set the hook. What happens next can be either a solid hook up or a limp fly line heading back over your shoulder. When it all comes together and the fish takes the fly clean, that moment would have to be one of the most addictive things about dry fly fishing.

West Coast - Pieman River - Reece Dam

Jamie Harris
Around 14 years ago, a workmate and keen fly fisher spoke of a mighty river, where the whitebait were so thick you could almost walk across them, and as far as the eye could see there were trout of all sizes smashing them on the surface. Only in my dreams had I seen such a place. I thought he was exaggerating. He said you could stand in the one spot and catch 20 or 30 fish in a couple of hours. He also said while he had only caught fish to 5 lbs, there were fish in double figures taken there every year. This was all I could take - I said, "Right, when are we going?!" Three weeks later we were there.

Curries River Dam

Damon Sherriff

Curries is a challenging water. It has had its ups and downs over the years but now thanks to the IFC its stocks are getting back on track. Curries is not every anglers cup of tea. The catch rate is normally lower than in other areas but the fish taken from Curries are of excellent eating quality.

A River Somewhere

The television show "A River Somewhere" did wonders for the fly fishing interest. Never has fly fishing had so much exposure in this country and  not a day went by where a client did not ask me if I had seen the show. Everyone loved it from novice to expert angler alike, and for good reason. The series was presented in a layed back fashion and the focus was certainly not about the result of fishing but the journey.

River Fishing Tactics

Finding feeding river fish--
Wind lanes, bays and weed beds are all fish (and fish food) producing areas well known to lake fishers. These fish producing areas are typically associated with lake fishing, and in the case of wind lanes, loch style fly fishing in particular. Whilst these features of fly fishing may appear to be unique characteristics of lake fishing, these same fish producing features are present on Tasmania's rivers and are capable of producing equally spectacular fishing oppurtunities. Add to these features some undercut banks and white water rifles and the angler will wonder why they ever ventured from their local stream!

River Rafting Reflections

There are some fishing experiences that simply change the way that you go about finding trout. Spending time on a river hunting fish creates so many fishing memories in just one day, that for one of those days to stand out means that it is very special indeed. An experience I will never forget is one of rafting down the Macquarie River near Launceston with Andrew Harker; a well known river rafting guide. Also accompanying me on that sensational day was Neil Grose and Andrew's daughter Sophie. 

Rivers - End of Season Fly-Fishing
Setting the Scene

In Tasmania the rivers are no doubt considered the poorer cousin of the lakes. This perception was likely started by the river fisher's who were quite happy to send their neighbours up to the lakes and keep the world class rivers to themselves! Believe or not the rivers that you have probably been passing on your way to the lakes can offer everything the lakes have - big hatches, polaroiding, tailing, the list goes on.

Henty River - A west Coast Gem

Terry Edwards reports on one of his favourite waters.

Approximately eighteen kilometres north of Strahan, the Henty River emerges from dense mountainous bushland and winds it's way to the rugged west coastline of Tasmania.

The river originates from within the West Coast Range, a dozen or so kilometres south of Rosebery. Several small streams and rivers contribute to the flow from this system, providing a seasonal scenario similar to the mighty Pieman River. In fact, I tend to refer to the Henty as a miniature, compact Pieman River.

New Zealand's Mataura River

by Ian Puller

If you have ever fished NZ, desired to fish NZ or are going to fish NZ the Mataura River is a "must visit" river. It is a dry fly fisher's dream, but other methods are also tolerated and successful. In writing this book describing the beautiful Mataura River in Southland, Ian Pullar has raised the bar for a book of this type.

Tasmania's best kept secret: Swan River bream

by Sandra Aulich

Most of our tourism information available for fishing in Tassie is confined to our marvellous trout fishing. As well-deserved as this may be, your average angler may only want to get away for a day of peace and relaxation and be sure of a fish for their efforts.

Kermandie River makes a come back

by Andrew Lawson

This waterway is found in the Southern region of the Island in and around the town of Geeveston. It has two main sources that originate from Rileys Creek reservoir constructed for the purpose of the town's water supply and the Kermandie river itself from below the falls.

Macquarie River in profile

by Tony Ritchie

Arguably the Macquarie River is Tasmania's best known for angling sport. Its main stem wanders through the open farmland of the Northern Midlands from Ross down to its junction with the South Esk River at Longford, covering about 80 kilometres and is fishable along most of its length.

West coast - Home of big fish and spectacular scenery

by Barry Wicks and Jaynee Coleman

For the low budget fishing and sight seeing holiday the Far North West Coast, and West Coast of Tasmania is well worth considering. Whereas large fish are dreamt of in many areas - the West Coast often rewards anglers with fish of leviathan size - both in fresh and salt water.

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