From the Archives ...

Sea runners - Early Season Excitement - Christopher Bassano

Presented from Issue 100
Considering the world class quality of our sea trout fishery, these fish are not sought after by enough anglers. Sea runners live in the salt water and run up our estuaries and rivers from the start of August to the middle of November. At this time of the year, they are here to eat the many species of fish that are either running up the rivers to spawn or are living in and around the estuary systems. Trout, both sea run and resident (Slob Trout) feed heavily on these small fish which darken in colouration as they move further into fresh water reaches.

The majority of these predatory fish are brown trout with rainbows making up a very small percentage of the catch. They can be found all around the state but it would be fair to say that the east coast is the least prolific of all the areas. They still run up such rivers as the Georges (and many others) but their numbers along with the quality of the fishing elsewhere make it difficult to recommend the area above the larger northern, southern and western rivers.

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Kids Stuff  - knots

by Michael Bok

In fishing one of the most important things that you can learn is to tie a good knot.

Understanding your environment - Tasmanian birds of prey

by Mike Stevens

It is important that we enjoy and appreciate the environment around us when we go fishing. Parks and Wildlife Service have a wealth of information on our wonderful flora and fauna. This is the first in a series of Parks and Wildlife Service on what you may encounter as you spend your day sharing nature with others.

Kids Stuff - How fish work

by Michael Bok

Think of a fish as a boat with oars on each side and a motor at the back. For this article I thought we would have a quick look at what is the most important thing in fishing - the fish itself.

Catch in the Kitchen

by Michael Bok

With winter approaching - rather too quickly, the following is a hearty, tasty recipe that can be made with most salt water fish.

This is a variation of one produced by "Two Fat Ladies", a current ABC program

Understanding tides

Taking the time to study tides, the moon and the effects that they have on fishing can have a profound effect on your fishing. Particular fish like certain tides and feed more consistently during certain phases of the moon. The following may help you to understand these foibles of the tide.

Sea sickness and how to avoid it

by Danny Sims

A thin bead of sweat breaks out on your forehead. You start to feel hot and flushed. A sinking, churning feeling begins to take over your stomach.

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