From the Archives ...

Sea run trout tactics – Craig Vertigan

Sea run trout tactics – Craig Vertigan

During the trout off-season I tend to spend a bit of time chasing bream, to continue getting a fishing fix, and spend time tying flies and dreaming about the trout season to come. It’s a time to spend doing tackle maintenance, stocking up on lures and dreaming up new challenges and goals for the trout season ahead. When the new season comes around I usually spend the first few months targeting sea runners. Sea run trout are simply brown trout that spend much of there lives out to sea and come in to the estuaries for spawning and to feed on whitebait and the other small endemic fishes that spawn in late winter through spring. Mixed in with the silvery sea runners you can also expect to catch resident fish that have the typical dark colours of a normal brown trout as well as atlantic salmon in some of our estuaries that are located near salmon farm pens. Living in Hobart it is quick and easy to do a trip on the Huon or Derwent and is a more comfortable proposition compared to a trip up to the highlands with snow and freezing winds to contend with.

Read more ...

Science debunks myth of fish pain

The science is in - fish don't feel pain. Anglers resume your pastime. Animal-rights activists retract the propaganda. Reversing the previous popular view that fish do feel pain, a team of seven scientists conducted extensive research to determine if the nociceptor responsible for pain in humans does they same thing in fish. The first discovery was that there were very few nociceptors in fish mouths. But it was also found that the fish brain does not contain the highly developed neocortex needed to feel pain in the first place. Read the article here Science Debunks Myth of Fish Pain

 

The conclusion reached by Professor James Rose from the University of Wyoming in the US, and published in the journal Fish and Fisheries, was that fish did not experience conscious feelings or pain when hooked. Rather, fish demonstrate an unconscious reaction to being hooked. The new research also referred to another study that showed fish that were caught with a hook and then released resumed feeding and normal activity immediately or within minutes. Certainly, I'll never forget the small wrasse I caught at The Spit, which was hooked deep, inverted part of its stomach, but was feeding in my saltwater tank that same day. So the whole fish-feel-pain issue has reached its conclusion. That is not to say fish welfare doesn't matter, but the findings do support the view that angling isn't a cruel practice.

 

Science Debunks Myth of Fish Pain 

Go to top
JSN Boot template designed by JoomlaShine.com