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Fishing Bruny Island Part 1 Trout and Bream fishing

Introduction

Bruny Island is an island off the South East Coast of Tasmania. It is situated around 40 minutes South of Hobart and is accessed from Kettering via the Mirambeena vehicle ferry. Bruny Island features the most southern hotel in Australia and was also where the first apples in Australia were planted. It has very little habitation with the bulk of the island being forestry areas or national parks and farms. The coast line is dotted with shacks and there are a few small residential areas.  It has beautiful beaches and exceptional surfing at Cloudy Bay.
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When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

Bicheno Report 11/06/2012

With the promise of very little wind and swell, Mike Stevens, Bailey & Phil Zanetto, along with myself, headed out to Bicheno early this morning (6am) with the aim of targeting a few striped trumpeter.

 Bicheno Striped Trumpeter

President Danny Jacobs, from Tamar Marine, recently had a striped trumpeter trip out of Bicheno with his mates Fitzy and Jason Fulton. Leaving  home at 5am to arrive at Bicheno at 7am, they headed up to Seymour and had been fishing five minutes when Jason caught his first ever Stripie.

East Coast Report

May is the beginning of the slower winter period for Tasmanian waters however there is still some great fishing on offer. With April seeing the end of the Brown Trout season for most Tasmanian waters its time to turn to the Rainbow fisheries that are still available to fish until the end of May. These waters include Dee Lagoon, Lagoon of Islands, Lake Rowallan, Lake Skinner, Mersey River above Lake Rowallan, Upper Mersey Lakes and the upstream sections of the two Weld Rivers. This time of year deep trolling with lead line is the preferred method for the lakes and still the possibility of fish on the dry fly in the North East stream.

Weymouth Easter 2012

We were invited to Weymouth for a couple of days over the Easter break to stay at a friend’s shack. The plan was to go after some flathead on the first day and a Mako the next. We arrived about lunch time on Friday and got the gear ready.

Bicheno Report

Went after a few tuna off the coast at Bicheno  today, had a great day out in the salt for a change, boating over twenty albacore with a couple of mates along with a good feed of quality flathead. The weather was quite good with a slight south east wind blowing but also quite bright but all in all just a great day with plenty of action....catch up soon.
President & ( Lake Leake) caretaker Mick

Swansea Report 18/3/2012

We went to Swansea this morning, leaving home at 7am, ...home at 3pm with our quota.
Sorry , not a lot of pictures, but I was flat out cleaning fish and didn't get a chance to take many photos.

Coles Bay Snapper

Here is a photo of a snapper we caught at Coles Bay.
5.5kg, 750mm long
Regards, Paul Aulich

Click Read More for another picture

Waterhouse Report

We headed to the shack at Blackman's Lagoon on Wednesday and stayed through to Sunday. Headed out on Blackman's in the tinny for a couple of hours, bagging a 3lb brown trout in good condition on a black and gold T-tail.
On Thursday, Jonny and I headed out on the sea in the afternoon at South Croppies. We caught 58 flathead, 3 undersize gummies and a squid in a 3 hour stint. 

Schouten passage Easter 2011

by Todd - Jim, Virginia and myself left home at 7am this morning with high hopes of getting onto a few.
Arrived at Swansea around 8.30ish only to find the boat ramp at dead low tide....nowhere near enough water to launch the boat.
Back in the car and off to Saltworks road, conditions perfect so we went straight out to the passage.

Ansons Bay Report

Just back from a family holiday at Anson’s Bay where the bream were very keen and the average size was the best I have ever seen.
Regards Corey Hogarth

Coles Bay

Hi everyone, the holiday is now over so I have found some time for a report .
We had 15 nights at Coles bay and considered ourselves very lucky this year as each year we seem to have a disaster, last year my niece broke her arm and tore a tendon, the year before Trev was hit in the head with a cricket bat and knocked out.... we had a very fast trip to Swansea hospital!!!

Fishing report Swansea 5/1/2011

Wednesday 5 January my family and I headed to Swansea to "hopefully" catch a feed of flathead.
Heading out from the Swansea town centre boat ramp at around 8am, hopes were high that the kid's and Janet would get onto a few. As for myself, I was "designated decky" and man o man did they keep me busy!!!
We headed out towards the Coles Bay side for about 10 minutes and pulled up to see what was about.......from the moment the rods hit the water, it never stopped.
In short, we caught our limit as well as throwing about 150 undersized ones back.
Janet and the kids also caught a couple of gummys and gurnards as by-catch... that were also returned.
As for myself, I am sipping on a well earned beer as I write this, with the smell of crumbed flathead coming from the kitchen....all is good with the world.
regards,
Todd L

Highest-ever winter water temperatures recorded off East Coast

by Craig Macaulay
Tasmania’s east coast is recording its highest-ever winter water temperatures of more than 13ºC  – up to 1.5ºC above normal – due to a strengthening of an ocean current originating north of Australia.
Satellites have given oceanographers an insight into a remarkable phenomenon – a significant extension of the Leeuwin Current curling around the southern tip of Tasmania and reaching as far north as St Helens.

East Coast lagoons backyard secrets

Jamie Henderson looks at his backyard lagoons around St Helens at some fantastic fisheries that are all but deserted at this time of the year. Access is easy, a boat is not essential and accommodation is bargain priced. Why not take a break in Tassie and enjoy the fishing.

Hot spot - North-east coast


Tasmania's north-east is one of the premium locations around the state. The real bonus for many are the shore-based opportunities. This combined with good camping creates an area that is treasured by many.

East Coast Winter Fishing Fun

By Patrick Sullivan

It would be untrue to say the winter in Tassie isn't cold because it is!!! But given that you dress accordingly it is possible to stay warm, catch a few fish and more importantly have fun doing it. Many people see winter as a time to stay home and rug up. While those that do make the effort to get out there and have a fish are often rewarded with more than just a few fish.

The East Australian Current

The East Australian Current is the largest ocean current close to the coasts of Australia, generating and enriching life on the driest continent. With its source in the tropical Coral Sea, north-east of Queensland, the East Australian Current (EAC) moves a substantial volume of low-nutrient tropical water south down the Australian coastline towards the temperate regions, with ocean eddies peeling off into the Tasman Sea on the way.
Few Australians realise the EAC is especially relevant to their lifestyle and livelihood - renewing fish stocks and aiding fisheries sustainability; dispersing effluent and marine pollution from coastal cities and renewing water quality; providing a "comfortable" water temperature for beachgoers, swimmers and surfers; and for assisting yachts sailing south in the Sydney to Hobart yacht race.

The White-breasted sea eagle in Tasmania

The edges of Macquarie Harbour, Freycinet Peninsula and Maria Island National Park are typical habitats for one of Tasmania's most spectacular birds - the white-breasted sea eagle - a bird of prey with a wing span sometimes exceeding 2 m and a weight of up to 4.5 kg.

Black bream fishing East Coast style

Luck, persistence and live bait

With Michael Morse

Arrangements were finalised with Jack to fish the Scamander River for bream. Jack is known in the region as Zane Grey, for reading Westerns and for his exceptional recreational fisherman skills.

Ansons Bay

The secrets revealed - local Ansons Bay angler Bert Blackwell takes a look at what is available in his favourite place.

East coast - productive fishing over winter and spring

by Michael Bok

Recently I had the chance to enjoy a days reef fishing with Rocky Carosi aboard Adosinda 11. I am a fisherman who will jump at any chance to fish with professional guides, as I am a firm believer that a days fishing with a good guide can teach you more than you can learn in ages by yourself.

Great Oyster Bay and Freycinet Peninsula

Best time to fish; All year

Getting there; 2 1/2 hours from Hobart, 2 hours+ from Launceston.

Major angling species; Rock lobster, flathead, couta and striped trumpeter, albacore, southern bluefin tuna, Australian Salmon, bream.

Other attractions; Swimming, surfing, sight seeing, National Parks - Douglas, Apsley and Freycinet, wineries.


The mid-east coast of Tasmania boasts some tremendous fishing with St Helens, at the northern end of the east coast and Tasman Peninsula at the southern end rated as Tasmania's premium game fishing areas.

The 15 kilometre run from Coles Bay at the northern end of Freycinet Peninsula out to open water - through Schouten Passage is probably the reason more game fishing is not undertaken here. Most game fishing is undertaken by holiday home owners in the area. Coles Bay is a superb protected bay with many holiday homes.

Flathead are the prime target in Great Oyster Bay as are seasonal squid. Large wrasse are also easily caught, but rarely kept as food. Whiting are targeted by a few anglers, but these seem to be in isolated pockets.

Shore and boat fishing is popular in the Swan River, just north of Swansea - especially for bream. One kilogram specimens are common and 2 kg fish regularly taken. There are several easily reached access points on the Swan River - mostly along the Dolphin Sands road. Crabs, prawns, pretty fish and nippers all make good bait. The Swan River also has good fishing in the lower reaches for large garfish and leatherjacket. While a boat can be useful here it is not essential for success.

On the southern side of Dolphin Sands is Great Oyster Bay. Nine Mile Beach and the many other beaches and rocky outcrops that flank the northern and western sides of Great Oyster Bay are great and popular fisheries.

While boat owners can access more water, the flat, mostly featureless sandy bottom of Great Oyster Bay yields little more than those outlined earlier. Most boat anglers drift for flathead with baits. Recently some anglers also successfully use large, bibbed lures in the more shallow areas with great results.

Anglers without a boat need not despair as fishing from many access points beside the main highway, on the western side of Great Oyster Bay, is often just as productive as from a boat in the more open waters.

The main pier at both Swansea and Coles Bay often has good congregations of squid that can be caught by anglers with jigs especially at evening. Schools of small Australian salmon and long fin pike are also common off these jetties as are mackerel.

A day on Great Oyster Bay can reward anglers with schools of dolphins, seals and whales as well as sea eagles and other extraordinary sights of nature.

A run down Great Oyster Bay takes you to Schouten Passage a deep water channel between Freycinet Peninsula and Schouten Island - a channel that is rich in food, fish and often turbulent currents. Down deep there are big flathead and wrasse with an infrequent striped trumpeter. It is often difficult to fish the bottom through the channel and large sinkers are needed.

Out through "the passage"striped trumpeter and large flathead are more common, yet certainly not prolific. A daily catch of four or five trumpeter is considered good.

Tuna can be caught close to shore. Albacore are more common here, while southern bluefin and sometime yellowfin are caught. Mako and blue shark are also taken. The southern tip and eastern shores of Schouten Island are the most productive.

A charter boat operates from Coles Bay and as well as fishing, offers sight-seeing and dive charters. This is one of the most scenic and beautiful parts of Tasmania. It would be a rare day when you couldn't catch a fish or be held spellbound by the beauty of the area.

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