willow sawflyWillow sawfly (Nematus oligospilus)

What is it?

Willow sawfl y is an insect which has recently arrived in Australia. The larval stage of the life cycle feeds on willow leaves, and large populations of larvae can defoliate adult willow trees.

Where did it come from?

Willow sawfl y is native to much of the northern hemisphere. It was fi rst recorded in South America in 1980, then in southern Africa in 1993 and New Zealand in 1997.

How did it get here?

It is unclear how willow sawfl y arrived in Australia, but it was not introduced deliberately. It is possible that adult sawfl ies were blown across from New Zealand or that cocoons were accidentally imported, for example on shipping containers. ..Read the PDF Flyer here

IMAS are looking for keen fishers to participate in their research angler logbook program. The logbook collects information on recreational catch including species caught, fish size and how many fish are kept or released. If you're interested please email Sean Tracey at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The logbook information provides important size and weight data that feeds into the Survey of Tasmanian Recreational Fishers to provide total catch estimates by weight.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

New to fishing in Tassie? Eleven different regional fishing maps are now available to download.

Features include: Where to Fish, What will I Catch and Local Fishing Facts. Plus a quick guide to Tassie fishing rules. Great for beginner fishers, tourists and families. Regions covered are:

East Coast, St Helens, the North East and Flinders Island;
Tamar Estuary, Devonport and Port Sorell, and the North West Coast;
Macquarie Harbour and King Island; and
Bruny D'Entrecasteaux Region, Derwent Estuary and the Tasman Peninsula

Hobart - Recreational Fishing in Tasmania for International Visitors and New Migrants
Fishers from culturally diverse backgrounds including Mandarin speakers are invited to an information session to learn more about fishing in Tasmania. Listen to talks from DPIPWE Fisheries, Fishcare Volunteers and Tasmania Marine Police officers and participate in practical workshops about identifying and measuring fish. English/Mandarin interpreters will be present.

Topics include:

Results from rock lobster sampled from the Maria Island Biotoxin Zone indicate PST levels below the regulatory limit.

The MARIA ISLAND ZONE will open:

· for setting rock lobster pots, at 13:00 on Saturday 17 February 2018; and,

· for taking rock lobster, pulling pots, rock lobster rings and diving for rock lobster, at 00:01 a.m. on Sunday 18 February 2018.

Biotoxin news

More information
Recreational Fisheries Section, DPIPWE
Phone: 1300 720 647
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: www.fishing.tas.gov.au
Facebook: www.facebook.com/FisheriesTasmania

Results from rock lobster sampled from the Central East Zone indicate PST levels below the regulatory limit.

PST levels in rock lobster sampled from the Maria Island Zone were not under the regulatory limit. PST levels have substantially decreased in recent weeks and lobsters will be sampled from this Zone next week.

The CENTRAL EAST ZONE will open:

for setting rock lobster pots, at 17:00 on Monday 22 January 2018; and,
for taking rock lobster, pulling pots, rock lobster rings and diving for rock lobster, at 00:01 a.m. on Tuesday 23 January 2018.

THE MARIA ISLAND ROCK LOBSTER ZONE REMAINS CLOSED TO TAKING ROCK LOBSTER.

Recreational Fisheries Section, DPIPWE
Phone: 1300 720 647
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: www.fishing.tas.gov.au
Facebook: www.facebook.com/FisheriesTasmania

 

The Central East and Maria Island rock lobster biotoxin zones remain closed. Analysis of the Rock lobster samples are underway at the certified laboratory in Sydney. Unfortunately, we have just been advised the results will not be available until Monday 22 January 2018 or Tuesday 23 January 2018.

Biotoxin news

Recreational Fisheries Section, DPIPWE
Phone: 1300 720 647
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: www.fishing.tas.gov.au
Facebook: www.facebook.com/FisheriesTasmania


kgwIf you catch and keep KGW’s we want your filleted frames. Preferably leave the guts in so we can sex each fish. Frames can be placed in a plastic bag and frozen with details of approximate area of capture, the date of capture and your contact details on a label left inside the bag. Once frozen drop them off at where this poster is or contact me and I will organise the details to collect them. Once obtained the frames will be used to determine their size, sex and maturity level, and remove the otoliths to age each individual.

 

 

If your interested in participating and want more information talk to the staff in this tackle shop
or
Call Dr James Haddy on 6324 3828.
or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Not So Carpy ChristmasNot So Carpy Christmas

Pictured - A "Judas" tracker carp

In the lead up to the festive season, we have continued to pull out all the stops in the fight against carp in Tasmania. The remaining carp have been very active within inshore regions due to warm water and recent rain events. This has been the time to strike: they are very susceptible to our methods while in these shallow regions. 
Please read more at https://www.ifs.tas.gov.au/news/not-so-carpy-christmas

Go to top
JSN Boot template designed by JoomlaShine.com