From the Archives ...

Presented from Issue 94

Sea run trout are somewhat of an enigma for many Tasmanian and travelling anglers. Our population are mostly comprised of brown trout which, by definition, choose to live most of their lives at sea. These fish then come into our estuary systems twice a year in order to feed (August – November) and to spawn (April – June). The best time to chase them is during the early months of the season when site fishing is a very real possibility.Read more ...

When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing -

Hello everyone, I thought it would be a good time to introduce myself.

My name is Stephen Smith and I have been managing the website since May 2009.

It has been an epic journey of learning and discovery and I am indebted to Mike Stevens for his help, support and patience.

I am developing a new venture Rubicon Web and Technology Training ( ). The focus is two part, to develop websites for individuals and small business and to train people to effectively use technology in their everyday lives.

Please contact me for further information.

Stephen Smith

Targeting Bream with Soft Plastics

In the last ten years or so, the humble bream has turned from a bread and butter species that was predominantly targeted by anglers using baits such as shrimp, prawns, crabs, bass yabbies/nippers, blood worms, sand worms, etc, into a highly prized sports fish that is now being targeted with great success by anglers using lure and fly.


In the winter things in our estuaries and coastal areas start to close down but not necessarily shut down. Sometimes I think we shut down a lot more than the fishing does. . I know its cold, but you normally get a lot of still calm days during the winter, which allows small boat owners to access areas they could not fish during the windy months. Some fish species actually get more active as the water temperature drops. Fish such as Garfish, Salmon, Flathead, Gummy Sharks, Couta, Blue warhoe and Sea Trout are all worth targeting throughout the winter months

Luring bigger flathead

Flathead, we know are one of our most loved fish. They are the backbone of Tasmania's recreational marine fishery and as table fare they are considered by many as second to none. Fresh or frozen it doesn't seem to matter too much; as nuggets, fillets or barbequed you can't ruin flathead.

Winter Warehou

During the winter months a lot of anglers pack their rods and reels up and go and do some much needed gardening and house maintenance which normally has been neglected over the summer months. But all you anglers out there, there is light at the end of the tunnel. Blue warehou can be caught throughout the winter months. They are great fighters and excellent on the table and in my opinion are the best eating fish in the estuary when eaten fresh.

East Coast Winter Fishing Fun

By Patrick Sullivan

It would be untrue to say the winter in Tassie isn't cold because it is!!! But given that you dress accordingly it is possible to stay warm, catch a few fish and more importantly have fun doing it. Many people see winter as a time to stay home and rug up. While those that do make the effort to get out there and have a fish are often rewarded with more than just a few fish.


After fishing the Tamar for many years and catching thousands of Southern Sand Flathead which the average size is around 25 cm. Flathead where not a species I readily target. That was up until this year when a friend of mine Barry Pagett and Peter Lees of Swan Point caught a 3.8kg (81/2lb) Southern Blue Spotted Flathead just off Bridport. After viewing the photos of this magnificent fish it gave me hope that there are flathead around bigger than 25cm.

Southern Autumn Hotspots

Autumn is a time to review fishing options and factor the weather in with chances of getting a feed. Whilst autumn can bring some unpleasant weather, the fishing - especially in marine waters can be excellent. In the following report we take a look at a few southern waters that will produce a good feed of fish and some good sport. Both shore and boat fishing is featured and with persistence you will catch fish.

The East Australian Current

The East Australian Current is the largest ocean current close to the coasts of Australia, generating and enriching life on the driest continent. With its source in the tropical Coral Sea, north-east of Queensland, the East Australian Current (EAC) moves a substantial volume of low-nutrient tropical water south down the Australian coastline towards the temperate regions, with ocean eddies peeling off into the Tasman Sea on the way.
Few Australians realise the EAC is especially relevant to their lifestyle and livelihood - renewing fish stocks and aiding fisheries sustainability; dispersing effluent and marine pollution from coastal cities and renewing water quality; providing a "comfortable" water temperature for beachgoers, swimmers and surfers; and for assisting yachts sailing south in the Sydney to Hobart yacht race.


Hard Howlers

Warning: This article is not for the weekend fisherman,  the tourist, the impatient - or people who don't like the dark or the cold. So if you are any of the above, please turn over now!

Chasing big snapper in Tasmania is, in my opinion, the most challenging type of fishing anyone can undertake. Many people think I am one of the luckiest fishermen in Tasmania, but I disagree - I make my own luck. I seriously concentrate on targeting big snapper. When I say, big snapper, I don't mean 5kg fish, I mean fish over 8 kg plus.

Kingfish Tactics

Every year, around January to April, we receive some  Northern visitors to the Tamar River. These hard and dirty fighting fish are not as common as they are further north, but for the dedicated angler, rewards can be high, particularly on that special day...

As you may have suspected, these visitors are - yellowtail kingfish.


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