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Atlantic salmon the hard way

Atlantic salmon the hard way

Scott McDonald
The first Atlantic salmon eggs used to begin Tasmania's Atlantic salmon aquaculture industry were introduced into Tasmania in 1984. From these humble beginnings a valuable Tasmanian industry has evolved with a worldwide reputation for having a premium disease free product. This industry provides a spin off to all anglers in the form of regular escapes of salmon from the farms.

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Port Sorell's Australian salmon

Craig Rist

Australian salmon seem to have been tailor made for the recreational angler. They're readily caught using a wide variety of fishing styles and techniques. When hooked, they fight hard and will display gill rattling leaps clear of the water adding to the excitement of catching these great fish. When the word gets out of their arrival in a particular area, anglers will travel long distances to pursue these light tackle fish.

Tasmanian Recreational Whitebait Fishery

Tasmanians can again take up the much-loved pastime of whitebaiting with the annual opening of the whitebait fishing season at the start of October. The season runs for six weeks from 1 October to 11 November in selected rivers around the State. Reports from the South and North of the State are that the whitebait runs are just beginning, with only a small number of fish being sighted making their way up some rivers. Hopefully, the high flow rates will subside enabling a solid run of whitebait and good numbers of fish available to fishers.

A northern winter Adventure

Craig Rist

As we all know, Tasmania has some great fishing, even during winter, but there's something very compelling and exciting about heading north to experience new waters. Squeezing in an extra 5 weeks of summer by heading north is definitely something to look forward to. Even more so when you are towing a 6 metre boat to one of Australia's best tropical fishing destinations. Mind you, wanting to go and actually taking that first step can be one of the hardest things to overcome.
It was late July, overcast and raining, as we drove onto the Spirit of Tasmania 3 in Devonport, bound for Sydney, the start of our road trip north to Cape York in far north Queensland.

James Haddy - the Bream Doctor

Bream'in with passion - by Dan Clifton
Passion for bream? Well if you have ever had the chance to just watch a bream do its thing, you will start to understand why they are the most addictive small fin fish in Australia. Not only are they tough on light gear, they are extremely intelligent and mysterious. Bream, like many species, proffer many questions. It is when you start to search for answers that you start to realise the truth behind the fact that we know more about the moon than we do ocean, and it is in our backyard.

East Coast lagoons backyard secrets

Jamie Henderson looks at his backyard lagoons around St Helens at some fantastic fisheries that are all but deserted at this time of the year. Access is easy, a boat is not essential and accommodation is bargain priced. Why not take a break in Tassie and enjoy the fishing.

Not only dreamers ..but doers

Jamie Henderson
As fisherman we are always dreaming of the perfect day on the water where everything comes together resulting in a meritorious catch, be it chasing brown trout in the highlands, bream in our estuaries or big game fish in our oceans its what drives us to keep trying even when we think it's a waste of time.

Kingfish

Mike Stevens
I had an early morning trip to late in March chasing kingfish with St Helens charter operator Michael Haley.
I had previously only caught one kingfish in Tasmania, but quite a few in NZ. There had been a lot of talk about kingfish, but not much catching.
Kingfish had been around Elephant Rock at St Helens for a while, and whilst quite a few people had been catching them plenty were struggling to get any.

Snotty Fishing at Stanley Wharf

Mark Heran
One of the hot spots of Tasmanian fishing, some would say an icon, is Stanley Wharf in the north west when the blue warehou are running. More commonly known as snotty trevally excitement is brewing locally as April and May traditionally is the time when big schools start appearing.
Mark Heran is a key member of the Fishcare Volunteers on the northwest coast. We interviewed Mark on his fishing pedigree and why he enjoys hooking a snotty trevally when they are on the boil.

When times get a bit rough.

Tim Anderson
With the recent spell of easterly winds on the north west coast, sea fishing from the trusty tinnie has been a bit ordinary to say the least.
Needing to get out and have a fish, Duck Bay estuary came to mind. This is still one of the coasts best systems for quality flathead fishing with soft plastics, along with the chance to catch gummy sharks, Australian salmon, King George whiting, couta and tailor and maybe a snapper. Smithton on the far north west coast is situated on the edge of the Duck river and this is where you can find a three lane boat ramp with plenty of good parking close by. When launched it pays to stay in between the channel markers to ensure a safe passage north to the main fishing area on the bay. Be aware though that the channel moves so take great care.

Tackling Snapper

Damon Sherriff

Chasing Snapper is a rewarding past time. It is more than just a hobby it is a major part of my life and I love it.

This time of year is normally a good time to chase big snapper. When the water temperature starts dropping the Tamar gets a run of larger fish. Pinkies or smaller snapper are normally caught through the warmer months. Snapper are caught in many areas. They are a bit like bream. You can catch them over mud, sand, reef and rubble. They eat mainly crabs but will still eat other food such as shell fish, cunji, crayfish and small fish. The Tamar has got thousands of snapper spots. Snapper move from bay to bay. Half the fun of snapper fishing is locating the school.
In this article I will discuss tackle for snapper and I hope that it will help you during this quest.

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