From the Archives ...

Low Head Report 14/6/2015

Despite the pretty cold and drab conditions I decided I'd go for a look off Low head yesterday[14/06/2015] for a Gummy and perhaps a few Flatties.I left Kelso ramp at 8.45am when at least it had warmed up a bit to be met by a sea that was devoid of swell and just some small wind waves.I went to a spot I fish fairly regularly and dropped the anchor in 18m of water. Usually I've got some burley but yesterday the freezer was empty.

Read more ...

When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing -

Hello everyone, I thought it would be a good time to introduce myself.

My name is Stephen Smith and I have been managing the website since May 2009.

It has been an epic journey of learning and discovery and I am indebted to Mike Stevens for his help, support and patience.

I am developing a new venture Rubicon Web and Technology Training ( ). The focus is two part, to develop websites for individuals and small business and to train people to effectively use technology in their everyday lives.

Please contact me for further information.

Stephen Smith

Sea fishing around Devonport

Shane Flude

Have you heard about the huge numbers of anglers flocking to Devonport from the east and west coasts to head to the impressive and exotic fishing grounds that lie offshore?
No, I haven't either.
This is because sea fishing out of Devonport just cannot compare to Tasmania's more famous locations such as Eaglehawk Neck, Georges Bay or St Helens.
However, this area is on my back doorstep and I've learned to make the most of the fishing and discover the best the area has to offer. I've found that there are more than enough fish species to target for an enjoyable day on the water.
This article looks at the fishing grounds between the Forth River mouth to the west of Devonport and as far east as Point Sorell.

Holidays at Burnie's Red Rock

Daniel Paull

Hi my name is Daniel, I am 15 and  I love fishing.. From my first fish to my most recent, fishing is a major part of my life.
When I'm not out in the boat with dad hunting shark or tuna, casting for bream or trout, there is only one place I would want to be, Red Rock.
Red Rock is situated on the North West coast of Tasmania in Burnie. Next to the Bass Highway near the suburb of Cooee it is a great spot for all ages to fish. Techniques play an important role in fishing from Red Rock. My dad, Mason, has taught me everything he knows about rock fishing, I have also picked up a few techniques myself from fishing from Red Rock.

Rock Fishing

Leroy Tirant
Fishing from rock platforms has been written about plenty of times before in various fishing magazines so I don't intend on reinventing the wheel. This article is intended more so as a reminder to anglers of the basics of fishing the stones.

Striped trumpeter

Jamie Henderson
The fish
Whilst at times here in Tasmania we feel as if we have been left out of some of the more romantic fisheries such as snapper, King George whiting, Spanish mackerel and barramundi we do have a fish that very few other states have in good numbers and that is Latris lineata or the striped trumpeter.

Silver trevally on soft plastics

Jamie Henderson

In the last few years we have seen a revolution in fishing techniques in the way soft plastic lures have opened up fisheries not normally associated with this style of fishing. Light tackle sport fishing has, seemingly taken over our inshore and estuary fishing areas. And some species not normally targeted as a "Sportfish" have turned full circle and become almost iconic with this form of fishing.


Damon Sherriff
There are many types of baits available. There is frozen, fresh, live or artificial and they all work.
Bait fishing is the most popular fishing method. Generally because any angler, of any skill level or any age can fish successfully.

Mussels: an open and shut case

Melissa Marino
Nick Ruello is a fisheries biologist, not a detective. But his love of seafood has led him to unravel one of the most pervasive urban myths around - that closed mussels are unsafe to eat.

Strahan and Macquarie Harbour

Great fishing, variety and spectacular scenery is what awaits anglers venturing to Tasmania's wild west coast.
Getting there takes about three and a half hours from Launceston or four and a half hours from Hobart (add half an hour if trailing a boat).
The major angling species are Atlantic salmon, rainbow trout, Australian salmon, shark, flounder, striped trumpeter, morwong, flathead and couta.

Port Sorell's Australian salmon

Craig Rist

Australian salmon seem to have been tailor made for the recreational angler. They're readily caught using a wide variety of fishing styles and techniques. When hooked, they fight hard and will display gill rattling leaps clear of the water adding to the excitement of catching these great fish. When the word gets out of their arrival in a particular area, anglers will travel long distances to pursue these light tackle fish.

Tasmanian Recreational Whitebait Fishery

Tasmanians can again take up the much-loved pastime of whitebaiting with the annual opening of the whitebait fishing season at the start of October. The season runs for six weeks from 1 October to 11 November in selected rivers around the State. Reports from the South and North of the State are that the whitebait runs are just beginning, with only a small number of fish being sighted making their way up some rivers. Hopefully, the high flow rates will subside enabling a solid run of whitebait and good numbers of fish available to fishers.


Go to top
JSN Boot template designed by