From the Archives ...

'DAD do you want me to show you how?'

Last weekend a few ANSA (Australian National Sportfishing Assoc.) members had a trip to North West Bay, south of Hobart and it absolutely went off. The short visit saw large Australian salmon 500mm plus, tailor and pick-axe couta all taken on silver slice Halco lures. The action was so fast with the Tailor and Salmon chasing pilchards in bait ball and couta flashing under the main school nailing anything that strayed from the safety of the mass that triple hook ups were the rule.

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When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

Devonport kingfish

Headed out from Devonport with a mate on Monday afternoon to try our luck with the Australian Salmon. When we finally arrived outside the mouth, we snuck our way around to where the other boats were (12 others) as they were all congregated together. It didn't take long and we were both on, lovely 1.3kgs Australian salmon. Hit after hit occurred for the next hour, but we hit the jackpot with four lovely yellowtail kingfish. What an awesome fighting (and eating) fish, especially on our 5kg trout gear. Needless to say I will be leaving the trout alone and heading back out to sea when weather permits next. All the kingfish weighed in at 1.6kg cleaned.

Cheers, Lance, Devonport.

Click Read More for a photo

Bridport Report January 25 2010 

We had a good day on 25th January out of my hometown, Bridport, with a few mates.  Whilst bottom bouncing for the usual flatfish, we had a thumping great school of medium sized salmon erupt all around the boat for a good 3 hours.  The fish looked pretty flighty and with good reason, as one the photos will show, as the local mako and couta population went to town on the them.  Quite a sight to see, not to mention the absolute noise of thousands of salmon thrashing for their lives on the surface.
Other than the salmon, everything else was a bit quiet, plenty of flatties but all quite small.

Click on Read More for lots of photos !

Mercury Passage

Mercury Passage on fire with good sized flatties and squid (southern part near Green Point).

Crays potting but only just !!!

Huon Report

Mike, please find below report from the Huon.  I am a member of the Desirables Fishing Club - which is a registered club in New South Wales - with current club president Mr Timion Rosso. We run an annual competition for the biggest fish caught in the "desirable species list".  Which includes flathead, bream, trout, murray cod, aussie salmon and kingfish.

Bridport Report January 2010

By Tom
We decided to head to the coast for a feed of flathead so Bridport was first choice as my father lives there.. free house overnight plus a chance to catch up with the old boy 91 years young.

Yellow eye mullet

Common names; Sand mullet.

Greenish brown along back with brown fins. Silver or yellow on the belly and eye distinctly yellow.

Squid

Squid are members of the cephalopod family (tentacled heads). Other famous members include octopus and cuttlefish. There are two types of squid that are of interest to keen Tasmanian anglers. These are Gould's squid (also known as arrow squid) and the southern calamari. Both squid live in deep water but the calamari is more likely to be found closer to the shore than the arrow squid.

Tasman Peninsula

Kayaker, Craig Vertigan takes us to his favourite spot. It is a great place to catch fish all year around.

Tassie has many great spots to take your kayak. One of my favourite spots is the Tasman Peninsula. Hundreds of kilometres of shoreline start at Dunalley Bay and finish opposite at Blackmans Bay. Norfolk and Frederick Henry are the most friendly for kayakers offering protection in many small bays and coves.

Huge broadbill caught off NE coast

Andrew McDougall was drop lining for blue eye trevalla in his six metre Razorline near the Eddystone Patch and got more than he bargained for.

King Island - unfished and waiting for you

One of the great things about King Island is just that - it is an island, and relatively compact as well. There are two main centres, being Grassy and Currie. Like virtually all major population areas in the world with coastal access, both have harbours. Grassy Harbour is on the south east coast and Currie Harbour is around a third of the way up the west coast. Both have good weather protection and both have some excellent fishing within their confines.

New rules resulting from the scalefish review will apply from November 1st 2009.

All changes are reflected in the 2009-10 Recreational Sea Fishing Guide and on new fish measuring rulers which are available at Service Tasmania outlets and most bait and tackle shops.

Set Line licence:  A licence is now required to use any set line. A set line is either a dropline or a longline, with up to 30 hooks. A person may only use one set line at a time.

SQUID for KIDS

Dan Clifton
Well what can I say what year it has been, there have been plenty of fish caught right throughout the winter in the Tamar River with trevally and kingfish amongst the mix of species caught during the off season.
Now that it is warming up and the mercury hitting close to 30. There are many fishos looking for something to target.

Upsizing your flathead catches

John Orchard
Flathead are the mainstay of the recreational fishery and whilst many people target other species on a regular basis, everyone loves a good feed of "flattie" and everyone hopes to catch that elusive monster flathead - The Lizard.

Flinders Island

For those of you that have never fished Flinders Island, do yourselves a favour! Take John Orchard's advice and DO IT.
For an island that only takes an hour to drive from one end to the other, it is packed with some of the best recreational fishing to be found in Tasmania.

Fishing from the Jetty

Daniel Paull
Intro
Fishing from a jetty is a great experience for people of all ages, especially for the amateur angler. Tasmania has some great jettys and piers along the coastline, Georges Bay being my personel favourite. Fishing from jettys can produce some great species. The best thing about jetty fishing is that you don't have to take a truck load of gear. All you really need is is a hook, line, sinker and bait. Prawns and squid usually do the trick and if you are like me and want to catch something huge, take some pilchards. I started my landbased fishing on a jetty on the beach across from Jetty Road (Georges Bay). It produced some great fish until it was closed to the public. There are still many great jettys to fish from in our great state. I can easily say that any jetty is a good one.

West Coast stripey trumpeter

Mason Paull

Introduction
I love fishing adventures and coupled with the promise of huge fish and a new location, I was keen to test this new spot. The stripey trumpeter (latris linaeta) commonly run from 1 to 8kg, but in offshore fishing grounds they can grow from 10 to 15kg with the odd monster to 25kg. These fish are primarily a forager and hunter, feeding on crustacea, shellfish, squid and octapi, although large fish will take small fish.
My good friend Geoff Cook and Mark Breadon had invited me to fish with them off the west coast, just south of the Arthur River.
The shelf off the northern end of the west coast is well out, but as you travel south it becomes more accessible. This said, it is still a long way out. Our launching site still had us traveling 21 nautical miles to sea. We were lucky enough to have a little inside information coming from a respected local angler who had fished this area extensively. Armed with the waypoint he had given us, we basically headed due west .

Land Based Seven Gill Sharks

Daniel Paull
Some people complain to me about the poor fishing these days. But when you see a story like this about two young blokes giving fishing their all it is refreshing. They are keen and "just do it'. Daniel Paull is already an awesome angler and is still a young teenager. Take lessons from this fine young man. Ed.

Australian Salmon

Shane Flude
There would be few Tasmanian anglers that have not caught at least a few Australian salmon. They are commonly called blackback in Tasmania with the smaller fish being known as cocky salmon. Many anglers target them specifically whilst others are simply caught as a bycatch. There can be no doubting their fighting abilities and they will test light gear to the limit. There have been numerous articles written over the years on this most popular sportsfish describing the correct techniques,tackle and fishing locations. There has not been much written about the life cycle of the fish itself and their general ecology in Australian waters. Shane Flude has done some research on our humble salmon and discovered some interesting facts.

Got the Winter Blues - How to get over them

Shane Flude
Well it's that depressing time of year again when Tassie plunges into another winter. We turn on our headlights to travel to work and on again to come home. The memories of the magnificent long summer evenings when we could still just polaroid that Western Lakes brown at 7 pm have faded. It will soon be the shortest day again, a time which surely marks the greatest depth of our winter period. So just what attractions await the frustrated angler during this coming bleak period either out to sea or inland chasing trout? The short answer for most is "not much'. There are a few places worthy of mention though and we will examine these areas and the best methods to use.

Port Sorell

Shane Flude
Fishing opportunities out at port Sorell will probably equal any are along the North coast of Tasmania. From the estuary itself to offshore reef fishing, the Port Sorell area offers an enormous selection of fishing opportunities.
This article gives a general rundown on the immediate area between Point Sorell and Badgers Head, the fish species available and various techniques.

Sea fishing around Devonport

Shane Flude

Have you heard about the huge numbers of anglers flocking to Devonport from the east and west coasts to head to the impressive and exotic fishing grounds that lie offshore?
No, I haven't either.
This is because sea fishing out of Devonport just cannot compare to Tasmania's more famous locations such as Eaglehawk Neck, Georges Bay or St Helens.
However, this area is on my back doorstep and I've learned to make the most of the fishing and discover the best the area has to offer. I've found that there are more than enough fish species to target for an enjoyable day on the water.
This article looks at the fishing grounds between the Forth River mouth to the west of Devonport and as far east as Point Sorell.

Holidays at Burnie's Red Rock

Daniel Paull

Hi my name is Daniel, I am 15 and  I love fishing.. From my first fish to my most recent, fishing is a major part of my life.
When I'm not out in the boat with dad hunting shark or tuna, casting for bream or trout, there is only one place I would want to be, Red Rock.
Red Rock is situated on the North West coast of Tasmania in Burnie. Next to the Bass Highway near the suburb of Cooee it is a great spot for all ages to fish. Techniques play an important role in fishing from Red Rock. My dad, Mason, has taught me everything he knows about rock fishing, I have also picked up a few techniques myself from fishing from Red Rock.

Rock Fishing

Leroy Tirant
Fishing from rock platforms has been written about plenty of times before in various fishing magazines so I don't intend on reinventing the wheel. This article is intended more so as a reminder to anglers of the basics of fishing the stones.

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