From the Archives ...

Adrian's 400th

Trout number 400 reached today. 6/4/2015

Needing another six more trout to reach the 400 for the 2014/15 season I thought a trip back to Merseylea would be worth a shot. I knew the Mersey River still had a good flow of water coming down and this area would give me the best chance of reaching the mark. I was in the river by 4.30pm and didn't realise how low the sun was, with daylight saving out of the way it was much lower than I expected. Still I knew I would still have at least two hours to get the trout I required. The first run of fast water didn't show any signs of a fish, but in the next run I managed five hook ups for three browns caught and released. This was just the start I wanted and I had only fished some twenty meters of this fast water. It went quiet for the next ten meters before I had another brown take the little Mepps black fury, it was soon in the net. With only two more required I was feeling pretty confident of reaching my target before I made it to the end of this fast run in which I still had some thirty meters left to fish. It didn't happen, the rest of the run didn't give a yelp much to my disgust.

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When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

Arthur River Salmon make the dive worthwhile

by Vance Murphy

While the far NW tip of Tasmania can't be referred to as the sunshine coast, it does have some very good fishing. The mainly revolves around the annual run of Australian salmon. These fish usually start to appear in November and stay through till the first major floods in the rivers push them out. This usually occurs from March to May.

Lake St Clair  - a great fishery - unfished

Greg French takes a look at Lake St Clair and St Clair Lagoon.

Just why the Lake St Clair system has failed to become very popular among anglers is a mystery. It is undoubtedly one of the very best trout fisheries in Tasmania today - and I suspect that it always has been.

Four Springs Lake now filling

After more than twenty years of coming to fruition the Four Springs Lake is now filling with water. This promises to be a fabulous fishery, located 20 minutes or so west of Launceston. Jim Ferrier reports.

Four Springs

Four Springs is one of the very few, angler initiated, dedicated public fisheries.In fact I can't think of any other waters that were built by anglers, for anglers that are public. It is a great credit to those that put in the work and it is one of our best Tasmanian waters - especially in the early part of the season when the highlands can be so cold and uninviting.

Bronte Lagoon - Tasmania's fishing centre

Bronte Lagoon is the most centrally situated water in Tasmania. It fishes very well throughout the year, but one must vary the techniques used. This profile is by Greg French and Rob Sloane and was first published in their book "Trout Guide", which is still available at book and tackle stores. Thanks also go to Harold Cornelius and Denis Wiss for their help.

Fishing Arthurs Lake with John Fox

John Fox is a professional Trout Guide and fishes Arthurs Lake for around 100 days each year. His success here is extraordinary and he puts much of it down to being flexible in his fishing techniques. Here are a few tips from John.

Arthurs Lake - a trouting smorgasbord

Arthurs Lake has, for many years been one of Tasmania's premium trout fisheries. This profile of the Arthurs Lake has been made possible with thanks to Rob Sloane and Greg French for information from their book "˜Trout Guide"plus trout guide - John Fox and Inland Fisheries Commissioner - Wayne Fulton.

Do we underestimate our Redfin Perch

The Redfin as it is known to most Tasmanians is not favoured by many anglers - although there is no reason why this should be so. The Redfin will take flies, lures and bait readily and is quite good to eat. A lot of anglers consider it a nuisance good ENGLISH PERCH (Redfin-Perca fluviatilis) According to a Royal Commission report on the fisheries of Tasmania issued in 1882-3, the English Perch was first introduced to Tasmania in 1862 by two brothers, Morton and Curzon Allport.

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